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Properties of Oxide Films on Ni–Cr–xFe Alloys in a Simulated PWR Water Environment

  • Xiangkun Ru
  • Zhanpeng LuEmail author
  • Junjie Chen
  • Guangdong Han
  • Jinlong Zhang
  • Pengfei Hu
  • Xue Liang
  • Wenqing Liu
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

The iron content in Ni–Cr–xFe (x = 0–9 at.%) alloys strongly affected the properties of oxide films formed in a simulated PWR primary water environment at 310 °C. Increasing the iron content in the alloys increased the amount of iron-bearing polyhedral spinel oxide particles in the outer oxide layer and facilitated the local oxidation penetration into the alloy matrix from the chromium-rich inner oxide layer. The local oxidation penetration was caused by the pile-up of the cation vacancies.

Keywords

Nickel-based alloys Simulated PWR water TEM Iron content Oxide film Local oxidation penetration 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Shanghai Municipal Commission of Economy and Informatization No. T-221715003, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51571138), and the International Cooperative Project sponsored by Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality No. 13520721200.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangkun Ru
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhanpeng Lu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Junjie Chen
    • 1
  • Guangdong Han
    • 1
  • Jinlong Zhang
    • 1
  • Pengfei Hu
    • 3
  • Xue Liang
    • 3
  • Wenqing Liu
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Materials, School of Materials Science and EngineeringShanghai UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special SteelsShanghai UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory for MicrostructureShanghai UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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