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In Situ Electrochemical Study on Crevice Environment of Stainless Steel in High Temperature Water

  • Y. SomaEmail author
  • C. Kato
  • F. Ueno
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement within crevice of stainless steel in 288 °C water has been conducted to analyze crevice water chemistry. Small sensors (\( {\varphi} {\sim} 250\,\upmu{\text{m}}) \) measured local solution electrical conductivity κcrev, polarization resistance and electrochemical corrosion potential. Real-time response of the κcrev as functions of bulk water conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration has been quantitatively analyzed. The κcrev differ more than an order of magnitude depending on the oxygen potential inside the crevice. The κcrev increased with addition of small amount of bulk DO (e.g. 30 ppb). The maximum κcrev was observed with DO of 32,000 ppb and became more than 100 times higher than that of bulk water. The effect of geometrical factors on the crevice environment was also found to play an important role in the water chemistry inside.

Keywords

High temperature water BWR Stainless steel Crevice water chemistry In situ measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study includes the result of collaborative research with Chubu Electric Power Co.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)Naka-GunJapan

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