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Calibration of the Local IGSCC Engineering Model for Alloy 600

  • Thierry CouvantEmail author
  • Jacqueline Caballero
  • Cécilie Duhamel
  • Jérôme Crépin
  • Takaharu Maeguchi
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Many Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) models have been developed so far. Quantitative empirical models, trying to predict initiation and crack growth rate of nickel alloys exposed to pressurized water reactor primary water do not describe physical mechanism and suffer a lack of accuracy. By contrast, models describing the possible involved physical mechanisms responsible for degradation (selective oxidation of grain boundaries in the case of Alloy 600 exposed to PWR primary water) are usually qualitative. In the current paper, a ‘local’ model is proposed to better predict SCC. In order to succeed, behaviors assumed to be involved in the SCC process were calibrated and coupled: intergranular oxidation rate, intergranular stresses, resistance to cracking of oxidized grain boundaries. The output of the model is the time to reach a given crack depth. This paper introduces the first calibration of parameters for Alloy 600 exposed to primary water.

Keywords

Intergranular stress corrosion cracking Alloy 600 Primary water Intergranular oxidation Crystal plasticity Fracture of oxidized grain boundaries Local model Initiation Crack growth 

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thierry Couvant
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jacqueline Caballero
    • 1
  • Cécilie Duhamel
    • 2
  • Jérôme Crépin
    • 2
  • Takaharu Maeguchi
    • 3
  1. 1.EDF R&DMoret-sur-LoingFrance
  2. 2.MINES ParisTechPSL—Research University, MAT—Centre des matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633EvryFrance
  3. 3.MHI, Takasago R&D CenterTokyoJapan

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