Advertisement

Limits of Victim Participation in Adversarial and Non-adversarial Systems—A Case Study of Germany and Australia

  • Kerstin BraunEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Victims and Victimology book series (PSVV)

Abstract

This chapter explores the general position of victims in criminal trials in Germany, a traditional inquisitorial system, and Australia, a mostly adversarial system. The analysis takes into account how criminal justice is currently understood in each system. It subsequently explores whether the introduction of victims’ participatory rights in the two states can be seen as a break from the traditional understanding of criminal justice as a conflict between state and defendant and a move towards a victim-focused process model. This includes analysis of the legislature’s motives behind the introduction of victim-related participatory rights, where available, as well as the reactions this kind of law reform has caused within the legal profession, political institutions and in scholarship. In light of the findings for Germany and Australia, the question is subsequently pondered whether future law reforms in the area of procedural rights for victims are likely to yield the envisioned results.

Keywords

Germany Australia General participation rights for victims Paradigm of criminal justice Reconceptualisation of criminal procedure 

References

  1. Altenhain, K. (2001). Angreifende und verteidigende Nebenklage. Juristen Zeitung, 2001(15), 791–801.Google Scholar
  2. Anders, R. P. (2012). Straftheoretische Anmerkungen zur Verletztenorientierung im Strafverfahren. Zeitschrift fuer die gesamte Strafrechtswissenschaft, 124(2), 374–410.Google Scholar
  3. Baptie, J. (2004). The Effect of the Provision of Victim Impact Statements on Sentencing in the Local Courts of New South Wales. The Judicial Review, 7(1), 73–88.Google Scholar
  4. Barton, S. (2012). Opferanwaelte im Strafverfahren: Auf dem Weg zu einem neuen Prozessmodell? In H. Pollaehne & I. Rode (Eds.), Opfer im Blickpunkt-Angeklagte im Abseits: Probleme und Chancen zunehmender Orientierung auf die Verletzten in Prozess, Therapie und Vollzug (pp. 21–42). Hamburg: LIT Verlag.Google Scholar
  5. Barton, S., & Flotho, C. (2010). Ofperanwaelte im Strafverfahren. Baden-Baden: Nomos.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bednarova, J. (2011). The Heart of the Criminal Justice System: A Critical Analysis of the Position of the Victim. Internet Journal of Criminology, 1–46. Retrieved from www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Bednarova_The_Heart_of_the_Criminal_Justice_System.pdf.
  7. Booth, T. (2007). Penalty, Harm and the Community: What Role Now for Victim Impact Statements in Sentencing Homicide Offenders in NSW. University of New South Wales Law Review, 30(3), 664–685.Google Scholar
  8. Booth, T., & Carrington, K. (2007). A Comparative Analysis of the Victim Policies Across the Anglo-Speaking World. In S. Walklate (Ed.), Handbook of Victims and Victimology (1st ed., pp. 380–416). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  9. Booth, T., & Carrington, K. (2018). Victims Support in Policy and Legal Process in Australia-Still an Ambivalent and Contested Space. In S. Walklate (Ed.), Handbook of Victims and Victimology (2nd ed., pp. 293–307). London: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  10. Bundesrat der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. (2009, April 3). Gesetzesentwurf der Bundesregierung: Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Staerkung der Rechte von Verletzten und Zeugen im Strafverfahren (2. Opferrechtsreformgesetz), BR-Drucks 178/09.Google Scholar
  11. Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer. (2009). Stellungnahme der Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer, zum Gesetzesentwurf der Bundesregierung zur Staerkung der Rechte von Verletzten und Zeugen im Strafverfahren (2. Opferrechtsreformgesetz-BT-Drucks 16-12098) BRAK-Stellungsnahme-Nr. 2009/9. Retrieved from https://www.brak.de/zur-rechtspolitik/stellungnahmen-pdf/stellungnahmen-deutschland/2009/maerz/stellungnahme-der-brak-2009-09.pdf.
  12. Bundesregierung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. (1986, April 10). Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Verbesserung der Stellung des Verletzten im Strafverfahren, BT-Drucks 10/5305.Google Scholar
  13. Bundesregierung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. (2003, November 11). Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Verbesserung der Rechte von Verletzten im Strafverfahren (Opferrechtsrefromgesetz-OpferRG) text identitical with Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Verbesserung der Rechte von Verletzten im Strafverfahren (Opferrechtsreformgesetz-OpferRG) der Fraktionen der SPD und B90/GR, BT-Drucks 15/1976.Google Scholar
  14. Bundesregierung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. (2009, March 3). Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Staerkung der Rechte von Verletzten und Zeugen im Strafverfahren (2. Opferrechtsreformgesetz) identical with Gesetzesentwurf der Fraktionen der CDU/CSU und SPD Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Staerkung der Rechte von Verletzten und Zeugen im Strafverfahren (2. Opferrechtsreformgesetz), BT-Drucks 16/12098.Google Scholar
  15. Bundesregierung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. (2015, April 15). Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Stärkung der Opferrechte im Strafverfahren (3. Opferrechtsreformgesetz), BT-Drucks 18/4621.Google Scholar
  16. Bung, J. (2009). Zweites Opferrechtsreformgesetz: Vom Opferschutz zur Opferermaechtigung. Strafverteidiger, 2002, 430–434.Google Scholar
  17. Christie, N. (1977). Conflicts as Property. British Journal of Criminology, Delinquency and Deviant Social Behaviour, 17(1), 1–15.Google Scholar
  18. Cook, B., David, F., & Grant, A. (1999). Victims’ Needs, Victims’ Rights: Policies and Programs for Victims of Crime in Australia (Research and Public Policy: Series No. 19). Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology.Google Scholar
  19. Corrado, M. L. (2010). The Future of Adversarial Systems: An Introduction to the Papers from the First Conference. North Carolina Journal of International Law & Commercial Regulation, 35(2), 285–296.Google Scholar
  20. Daigle, L. (2012). Victimology: The Essentials. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  21. Dearing, A. (2017). Justice for Victims of Crime: Human Dignity as the Foundation of Criminal Justice in Europe. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Deutscher Anwaltsverein. (2014). Stellungnahme des Deutschen Anwaltvereins durch die Task Force “Anwalt für Opferrechte” unter Beteiligung des DAV-Ausschusses Strafrecht zum Referentenentwurf des Bundesministeriums der Justiz und für Verbraucherschutz Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Stärkung der Opferrechte im Strafverfahren (3. Opferrechtsreformgesetz) Stellungnahme Nr.: 66/2014, Dezember 2014. Retrieved from https://www.bmjv.de/SharedDocs/Gesetzgebungsverfahren/Stellungnahmen/2014/Downloads/12162014_Stellungnahme_DAV_RefE_Staerkung_Opferrechte_Strafverfahren.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=1.
  23. Deutscher Richterbund. (2010). Gutachten der Großen Strafrechtskommission, Staerkung der Rechte des Opfers auf Gehoer im Strafverfahren. Germany: Deutscher Richterbund.Google Scholar
  24. Doak, J. (2004). Victims’ Rights and the Adversarial Trial: The Impact of Shifting Parameters (Doctoral dissertation). Queen’s University Belfast.Google Scholar
  25. Doak, J. (2005). Victims’ Rights in Criminal Trials: Prospects for Participation. Journal of Law and Society, 32(2), 294–316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Doak, J. (2015). Enriching Trial Justice for Crime Victims in Common Law Systems: Lessons from Transitional Environments. International Review of Victimology, 21(2), 139–160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Doelling, D. (2007). Zur Stellung des Verletzten im Strafverfahren. In G. Britz, et al. (Eds.), Festschrift fuer Heike Jung zum 65. Geburtstag am 23. April 2007 (pp. 77–86). Baden-Baden: Nomos.Google Scholar
  28. Douglas, R., & Laster, K. (1994). Victim Information and the Criminal Justice System: Adversarial or Technocratic. Bundoora, VIC: Criminology Research Council.Google Scholar
  29. Duenkel, F. (2001). The Victim in Criminal Law—On the Way from Offender-Related to Victim Related Criminal Justice. In E. A. Fattah, S. Parmentier, & T. Peters (Eds.), Victim Policies and Criminal Justice on the Road to Restorative Justice: A Collection of Essays in Honour of Tony Peters (pp. 167–211). Leuven: Leuven University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Edwards, I. (2002). The Place of Victims’ Preferences in the Sentencing of “Their” Offenders. Criminal Law Review, 2002, 689–702.Google Scholar
  31. Elizabeth, S. (2008). The Newest Spectator Sport: Why Extending Victims’ Rights to the Spectators’ Gallery Erodes the Presumption of Innocence. Duke Law Journal, 58(2), 275–309.Google Scholar
  32. Erez, E., & Bienkowska, E. (1993). Victim Participation in Proceedings and Satisfaction with Justice in the Continental Systems: The Case of Poland. Journal of Criminal Justice, 21(1), 47–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Erez, E., & Roeger, L. (1999). Victim Impact Statements and Sentencing: Outcomes and Process. British Journal of Criminology, 39(2), 216–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Ericson, R., & Baranek, P. (1982). The Ordering of Justice: A Study of Accused Persons as Dependants in the Criminal Justice Process. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Cited in Doak, J. (2004). Victims’ Rights and the Adversarial Trial: The Impact of Shifting Parameters (p. 342) (Doctoral dissertation). Queen’s University Belfast.Google Scholar
  35. Fattah, E. (2004). Gearing Justice Action to Victim Satisfaction Contrasting Two Justice Philosophies: Retribution and Redress. In H. Kaptein & M. Malsch (Eds.), Crime, Victims and Justice: Essays on Principles and Practice (pp. 16–30). Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  36. Ferber, S. (2016). Stärkung der Opferrechte im Strafverfahren – Das 3. Opferrechtsreformgesetz. Neue Juristische Wochenschrift, 2016(69), 279–283.Google Scholar
  37. Findlay, M., Odgers, S., & Yeo, S. (2009). Australian Criminal Justice (4th ed.). Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Frehsee, D. (2000). Wiedergutmachung und Taeter-Opfer Ausgleich im deutschen Strafrecht- Entwicklung, Moeglichkeiten und Probleme. In B. Schuenemann & M. D. Dubber (Eds.), Die Stellung des Opfers im Strafrechtssystem: Neue Entwicklungen in Deutschland und in den USA (pp. 117–137). Koeln: Carl Heymanns.Google Scholar
  39. Garkawe, S. (1994). The Role of the Victim During Criminal Court Proceedings. The University of New South Wales Law Journal, 17(2), 595–616.Google Scholar
  40. Garkawe, S. (2003). The History of the Legal Rights of Victims of Crime in the Australian Criminal Justice System. In Victims of Crime Bureau, NSW Attorney-General’s Department (Ed.), Raising the Standards: Charting Government Agencies’ Responsibilities to Implement Victims’ Rights (pp. 35–42). Sydney: Victims of Crime Bureau.Google Scholar
  41. Garland, D. (2001). The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Goodey, J. (2000). An Overview of Key Themes. In A. Crawford & J. Goodey (Eds.), Integrating a Victim Perspective Within Criminal Justice: International Debates (pp. 13–34). Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  43. Goodey, J. (2005). Victims and Victimology: Research, Policy and Practice. Harlow, UK: Person Longman. Quoted in Bednarova, J. (2011). The Heart of the Criminal Justice System: A Critical Analysis of the Position of the Victim. Internet Journal of Criminology, 1–46. Retrieved from www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Bednarova_The_Heart_of_the_Criminal_Justice_System.pdf.
  44. Grant, A., David, F., & Cook, B. (2002). Victims of Crime. In A. Graycar & P. Grabosky (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Australian Criminology (pp. 281–293). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Groenhuijsen, M. S. (2004). Victims’ Rights and Restorative Justice: Piecemeal Reform of the Criminal Justice System or a Change of Paradigm? In H. Kaptein & M. Malsch (Eds.), Crime, Victims and Justice: Essays on Principles and Practice (pp. 63–79). Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  46. Groenhuijsen, M. (2014). The Development of International Policy in Relation to Victims of Crime. International Review of Victimology, 20(1), 31–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Hall, M. (2017). Victims of Crime, Construction, Governance and Policy. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Hassemer, W. (1990). Einfuehrung in die Grundlagen des Strafrechts. Munich: C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  49. Hassemer, W., & Matussek, K. (1996). Das Opfer als Verfolger. Franfurt am Main: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  50. Herrmann, J. (2010). Die Entwicklung des Opferschutzes im deutschen Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht-Eine unendliche Geschichte. Zeitschrift fuer Internationale Strafrechtsdogmatik, 3, 236–245.Google Scholar
  51. Hoernle, T. (2006). Die Rolle des Opfers in der Straftheorie und im materiellen Strafrecht. Justisten Zeitung, 19, 950–958.Google Scholar
  52. Hoernle, T. (2011). Gegenwärtige Strafbegründungstheorien. Die herkömmliche deutsche Diskussion. In A. von Hirsch, U. Neumann, & K. Seelmann (Eds.), Strafe – Warum? Gegenwärtige Strafbegründungen im Lichte von Hegels Straftheorie (pp. 11–30). Baden-Baden: Nomos.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Horovitz, A., & Weigend, T. (2011). Human Dignity and Victims’ Rights in the German and Israeli Criminal Process. Israeli Law Review, 44, 263–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Karmen, A. (2007). Crime Victims: An Introduction to Victimology (6th ed.). Belmont, CA and Wadsworth: Cengage Learning.Google Scholar
  55. Karmen, A. (2012). Crime Victims: An Introduction to Victimology (8th ed.). Belmont, CA and Wadsworth: Cengage Learning.Google Scholar
  56. Kilchling, M. (1992). Die Stellung des Verletzten im Strafverfahren: Implementation und Evaluation des Opferschutzgesetzes. Freiburg im Breisgau: Max-Planck Institut fuer Auslaendisches und Internationales Strafrecht.Google Scholar
  57. Kilchling, M. (2002). Opferschutz und der Strafanspruch des Staates- ein Wiederspruch. Neue Zeitschrift fuer Strafrecht, 22, 57–66.Google Scholar
  58. Kilchling, M. (2010). Veraenderte Perspektiven auf die Rolle des Opfers im gesellschaftlichen, sozialwissenschaftlichen und rechtspolitischen Diskurs. In J. Hartmann (Ed.), Perspektiven professioneller Opferhilfe (pp. 39–50). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Kirchengast, T. (2006). The Victim in Criminal Law and Justice. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Kirchengast, T. (2010). Proportionality in Sentencing and the Restorative Justice Paradigm: ‘Just Deserts’ for Victims and Defendants Alike? Criminal Law and Philosophy, 4, 197–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Kirchengast, T. (2013). Victim Lawyer’s, Victim Advocates, and the Adversarial Criminal Trial. New Criminal Law Review, 16, 568–594.Google Scholar
  62. Kirchengast, T. (2016). Victims and the Criminal Trial. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Lanham, D., Bartal, B., Evans, R., & Wood, D. (2006). Criminal Laws in Australia. Annandale, NSW: The Federation Press.Google Scholar
  64. Meier, B.-D. (2009). Strafrechtliche Sanktionen (3rd ed.). Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Miller, S. L., & Hefner, M. K. (2015). Procedural Justice for Victims and Offenders? Exploring Restorative Justice Processes in Australia and the US. Justice Quarterly, 32(1), 142–167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Newlove, B. H. (2015). The Silenced Victim: A Review of the Victim Personal Statement. London: Office of the Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses.Google Scholar
  67. New South Wales Legislative Assembly. (1987). Second Reading Speech, Crimes (Sentencing Speech, Crimes (Sentencing) Amendment Bill. New South Wales Parliamentary Debates, November 12, 1987, 915 (Barrie John Unsworth, MP) cited in Baptie, J. (2004). The Effect of the Provision of Victim Impact Statements on Sentencing in the Local Courts of New South Wales. The Judicial Review, 7(1), 73–88.Google Scholar
  68. O’Connell, M. (2015). The Evolution of Victims’ Rights and Services in Australia. In D. Wilson & S. Ross (Eds.), Crime, Victims, and Policy International Contexts, Local Experiences (pp. 240–278). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Pemberton, A., & Aarten, P. G. M. (2017). A Radical in Disguise: Judith Shklar’s Victimology and Restorative Justice. In I. Aertsen & B. Pali (Eds.), Critical Restorative Justice (pp. 315–330). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  70. Plater, D., & Line, L. (2012). Has the ‘Silver Thread’ of the Criminal Law Lost Its Lustre? The Modern Prosecutor as a Minister of Justice. The University of Tasmania Law Review, 31(2), 55–95.Google Scholar
  71. Pollaehne, H. (2012). Opfer im Blickpunkt- Taeter im Toten Winkel. In H. Pollaehne & I. Rode (Eds.), Opfer im Blickpunkt-Angeklagte im Abseits. Probleme und Chancen zunehmender Orientierung auf die Verletzten in Prozess, Therapie und Vollzug (pp. 5–20). Hamburg: LIT Verlag.Google Scholar
  72. Pollaehne, H. (2016). Zu viel geopfert!? Eine Kritik der Viktimisierung von Kriminalpolitik und Strafjustiz. Strafverteidiger, 10, 671–678.Google Scholar
  73. Reemtsma, J. P. (2005). Was sind eigentlich Opferinteressen. Rechtsmedizin, 15, 86–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Riess, P. (2007). Zur Beteiligung des Verletzten im Strafverfahren. In G. Britz, et al. (Eds.), Festschrift fuer Heike Jung zum 65. Geburtstag am 23. April 2007 (pp. 751–760). Baden-Baden: Nomos.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Riess, P. (2009). Entwicklungstendenzen in der deutschen Strafprozessgestaltung seit 1950. Zeitschrift fuer Internationale Strafrechtsdogmatik, 10, 466–483.Google Scholar
  76. Rock, P. (2014). Victims’ Rights. In I. Vanfraechem, A. Pemberton, & F. M. Ndahinda (Eds.), Justice for Victims, Perspectives on Rights, Transition and Reconciliation (pp. 11–31). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  77. Ross, S. (2015). Victims in Australian Criminal Justice Systems: Principles, Policy an (Distr)action. In D. Wilson & S. Ross (Eds.), Crime, Victims, and Policy International Contexts, Local Experiences (pp. 214–239). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  78. Safferling, C. (2011). The Role of the Victim in the Criminal Process—A Paradigm Shift in National German and International Law. International Criminal Law Review, 11(2), 183–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Sanders, A., & Jones, I. (2012). The Victim in Court. In S. Walklate (Ed.), Handbook of Victims and Victimology (pp. 282–308). London: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  80. Sankoff, P. (2007). Is Three Really a Crowd? Evaluating the Use of Victim Impact Statements Under New Zealand’s Revamped Sentencing Regime. New Zealand Law Review, 3, 459–498.Google Scholar
  81. Sankoff, P., & Wansbrough, L. (2006). Is Three Really a Crowd? Thoughts About Victim Impact Statements and New Zealand’s Revamped Sentencing Regime. Paper Presented at the 20th International Conference of the International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law Brisbane, July 2–July 6, 2006.Google Scholar
  82. Schiemann, A. (2012). Macht des Opfers – Ohnmacht des Beschuldigten: – Vom Ungleichgewicht der Rechte und Pflichten im deutschen Strafverfahren. Kritische Vierteljahresschrift für Gesetzgebung und Rechtswissenschaft, 95(2), 161–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Schroth, K. (2009). 2. Opferrechtsreformgestz- Das Strafverfahren auf dem Weg zum Parteienprozess? Neue Juristische Wochenschrift, 62, 2916–2919.Google Scholar
  84. Schuenemann, B. (2002). Wohin treibt der Deutsche Strafprozess? Zeitschrift fuer die Gesamte Strafrechtswissenschaft, 114(1), 1–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Schuenemann, B. (2009). Risse im Fundament, Flammen im Gebaelk: Die Strafprozessordnung nach 130 Jahren. Zeitschrift fuer Internationale Strafrechtsdogmatik, 10, 484–494.Google Scholar
  86. Shapland, J. (2010). Victims and Criminal Justice in Europe. In S. G. Shoham, P. Knepper, & M. Kett (Eds.), International Handbook of Criminology (pp. 347–372). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.Google Scholar
  87. Shapland, J., & Hall, M. (2010). Victims at Court: Necessary Accessories or Principal Players at Centre Stage. In A. Bottoms & J. Roberts (Eds.), Hearing the Victim, Adversarial Justice, Crime Victims and the State (pp. 163–199). Cullompton: Willian Publishing.Google Scholar
  88. Stevens, M. (2000). Victim Impact Statements Considered in Sentencing. Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law, 2(1), 1–13.Google Scholar
  89. Stoffers, K. F., & Moeckel, J. (2013). Beteiligtenrechte im Strafprozessualen Adhaesionsverfahren. Neue Juristische Wochenschrift, 12, 830–832.Google Scholar
  90. van Caenegem, W. (1999). Advantages and Disadvantages of the Adversarial System in Criminal Proceedings. Law Faculty Publications, Paper 224. Bond University E-publications, pp. 69–102.Google Scholar
  91. Victim Support Agency. (2009). A Victim’s Voice: Victim Impact Statements in Victoria—Findings of an Evaluation into the Effectiveness of Victim Impact Statements in Victoria. Melbourne, Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  92. Victorian Law Reform Commission. (2016). The Role of Victims of Crime in the Criminal Trial Process—Final Report. Melbourne: Victorian Law Reform Commission.Google Scholar
  93. von Galen, M. G. (2012). ‘Parallel Justice’ für Opfer von Straftaten, Ein Verfahren mit‚ Opfervermutung’ außerhalb des Strafrechts, Beitrag zum 36. Strafverteidigertag, Hannover 2012 (pp. 69–89). Retrieved from http://www.strafverteidigervereinigungen.org/Material/Themen/Opferrechte/36_Galen_opfer.pdf.
  94. Volckart, B. (2005). Opfer in der Strafrechtspflege. Juristische Rundschau, 5, 181–187.Google Scholar
  95. Walther, S. (1999). Was soll “Strafe”. Zeitschrift fuer die Gesamte Strafrechtswissenschaft, 111, 123–143.Google Scholar
  96. Walther, S. (2008). Interessen und Rechtsstellung des Verletzten im Strafverfahren. Juristische Rundschau, 2008, 405–410.Google Scholar
  97. Weigend, T. (1987). Das Opferschutzgesetz-kleine Schritte zu welchem Ziel? Neue Juristische Wochenschrift, 40, 1170–1177.Google Scholar
  98. Weigend, T. (2010). „Die Strafe fuer das Opfer“? Zur Rennaisance des Genugtuungsgedankens im Straf- und Strafverfahrensrecht. Zeitschrift fuer Rechtswissenschaftliche Forschung, 1, 39–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Weigend, T. (2017). Alle sind sich einig-und das Opfer? In C. Safferling, G. Kett-Straub, C. Jaeger, H. Kudlich, & F. Streng (Eds.), Festschrift fuer Franz Streng zum 70. Geburtstag (pp. 781–798). Heidelberg: D.F. Mueller.Google Scholar
  100. Williams, B. (2005). Victims of Crime and Community Justice. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  101. Wolhuter, L., Olley, N., & Denham, D. (2009). Victimology and Victims’ Rights. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Case

  1. DPP v. Dupas [2007] VSC 305 (Victoria).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia

Personalised recommendations