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Providing Spiritual Care: An Exploration of Required Spiritual Care Competencies in Healthcare and Their Impact on Healthcare Provision

  • René van LeeuwenEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Healthcare workers deliver holistic patient-centred care. Spiritual care is part of that. To deliver spiritual care, the healthcare worker should be competent for that. These competencies could be divided in three domains, namely:
  • Awareness and use of self: this domain is about the healthcare workers’ intra- and interpersonal communications and attitudes in spiritual care delivery.

  • Spiritual dimensions of the nursing process: this domain is about the role of the healthcare worker in spiritual assessment, planning, interventions and evaluation of spiritual care within the integral nursing process.

  • Assurance of quality and expertise: this domain of competence is about the healthcare workers’ professional development regarding spiritual care.

In this chapter these competencies will be further theoretically clarified and applied in specific exercise that enables the reader to work on his/her spiritual care competence.

Keywords

Spiritual care Competence Intrapersonal Interpersonal Nursing process Professionalism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Viaa Christian University of Applied SciencesZwolleThe Netherlands

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