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Spiritual Assessment in Healthcare: An Overview of Comprehensive, Sensitive Approaches to Spiritual Assessment for Use Within the Interdisciplinary Healthcare Team

  • Wilfred McSherryEmail author
  • Linda Ross
  • Karnsunaphat Balthip
  • Natasha Ross
  • Sadie Young
Chapter

Abstract

The provision of healthcare involves dialogue and interaction between those receiving and those providing care. These interactions incorporate the need for building relationships based upon mutual trust and respect. The delivery of healthcare across all professions necessitates the need to conduct some form of assessment to identify an individual’s healthcare needs. This assessment should be holistic in nature addressing all aspects of the person including physical, psychological, social and spiritual domains. However, because of the misconceptions and assumptions associated with the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs of the person are often overlooked and neglected in the delivery of healthcare. Therefore, this chapter provides a brief overview of some of the key features of spiritual assessment offering a new pragmatic two-question model for spiritual assessment and goes on to explore how the model may be useful in addressing spiritual needs in a range of different settings.

Keywords

Holistic Spirituality Spiritual assessment Spiritual needs Spiritual care 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We would like to thank Professor Maggie Kirk for sharing her experience of being a patient. Maggie was Professor of Genetics Education, School of Care Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences and Education, University of South Wales, before she retired.

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Suggested Reading

  1. McSherry W, Ross L, editors. Spiritual assessment in healthcare practice. 1st ed. Keswick: M&K Publishing; 2010.Google Scholar
  2. Puchalski C, Romer AL. Taking a spiritual history allows clinicians to understand patients more fully. J Palliat Med. 2000;3(1):129–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Stoll R. Guidelines for spiritual assessment. Am J Nurs. 1979;1:1572–7.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilfred McSherry
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Linda Ross
    • 4
  • Karnsunaphat Balthip
    • 5
  • Natasha Ross
    • 6
  • Sadie Young
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Nursing, School of Health and Social CareStaffordshire UniversityStaffordUK
  2. 2.The University Hospitals of North Midlands, NHS TrustStoke-on-TrentUK
  3. 3.VID Specialized University (Haraldsplass Campus)StavangerNorway
  4. 4.Faculty of Life Sciences and Education, School of Care SciencesUniversity of South WalesPontypriddUK
  5. 5.Public Health Nursing Department, Faculty of NursingPrince of Songkla UniversityHatyaiThailand
  6. 6.Faculty of Life Sciences and Education, School of Psychology and Therapeutic StudiesUniversity of South Wales, City CampusNewportUK

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