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Teaching and Learning About Spirituality in Healthcare Practice Settings

  • Jacqueline WhelanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter considers the importance of contemporary teaching and learning approaches to spirituality within healthcare practice drawing on international evidence. The chapter integrates recent systematic literature challenges and issues that relate to its integration. Spirituality is recognised as a standard for good practice; attention is drawn to research that outlines guidance arising from international standards, guidelines, professional codes of practice and competency frameworks and key competency skills across healthcare. A consensus definition of spirituality is offered to understand spirituality within healthcare practice. Spiritual awareness, meaning making and respecting patient’s worldviews are recognised as core spiritual care competencies. Spiritual care needs, undertaking a spiritual history, formal and informal spiritual assessment methods, spiritual distress and timely referral are established as core spiritual care competencies. It is acknowledged that humanistic compassionate person-centred approaches grounded in connection are warranted to transform the educational process for the patient, student and practitioner experiences in healthcare.

Keywords

Spirituality Teaching and learning spirituality Spiritual competent practice Spiritual awareness Cultural competence Meaning making Spiritual care Spiritual care provision Spiritual needs Spiritual distress Spiritual assessment Spiritual assessment tools Barriers 

Abbreviations

ACP - ASIM

American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine

CSI Memo Spiritual History

Comfort Stress Influence Mem (Member) Other spiritual needs

ETHNICS

Explanation Treatment Healers Negotiate Intervention Collaborate Spirituality

FICA Spiritual History

Faith, Importance and Influence, Community and Address

FAITH

F Faith A Application I Influence/importance T Talk/terminal events planning H Help

HCN

Healthcare Chaplaincy Network

HOPE

H Sources of Hope, meaning comfort, strength, peace love and connection O Organised religion P Personal Spirituality and Practices E Effects on medical care and end of life issues

NANDA

North American Nursing Diagnostic Association

SHALOM

Spiritual Health and Life - Orientation Measure

SPIRITual History

Spiritual Belief System Personal Spirituality Integration with a spiritual community Integration with a spiritual community Ritualised Practice’s and Restrictions Implications for Medical Care Terminal Event Planning

RCN

Royal College of Nursing

2Q-SAM

2Two Qquestion Spiritual Assessment Model

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Nursing and MidwiferyTrinity CollegeDublinIreland

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