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Introduction

  • Ilan ManorEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Series in Global Public Diplomacy book series (GPD)

Abstract

Recently, scholars have offered a plethora of terms to conceptualize the utilization of digital technologies in the conduct of public diplomacy. These have included public diplomacy 2.0, virtual diplomacy and digital diplomacy. This chapter contends that none of these terms amply capture the impact of digital technologies on the conduct of public diplomacy. This is because diplomatic institutions do not exist in a binary state of being either digital or non-digital, nor can they be separated into those who have digitalized their public diplomacy activities and those who have not. This chapter, therefore, introduces a new term, “the digitalization of public diplomacy,” which serves as a conceptual framework for investigating the manner in which digital technologies influence the norms, values and working routines of diplomatic institutions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of International DevelopmentUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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