Advertisement

Ship Recycling

  • Nikos MikelisEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses the recycling of ships, otherwise known as dismantling, ship breaking, scrapping, and demolition. The size and age profile of the world fleet, the conditions that lead to ending the operating life of a ship, and the countries where the recycling of ships is concentrated are first examined. This is followed by an analysis of the economic drivers of ship recycling, which have resulted in the industry being dominated by five countries and also analyzes steelmaking as the main driving force for ship recycling. We then discuss the sale and purchase market for end-of-life ships, explain the roles of brokers and cash buyers, and provide a simplified inventory of the components that are recycled out of a ship. We outline the efforts to implement existing international legislation to ship recycling, and the development of the Hong Kong Convention, and provide a critical analysis of the development of regional legislation by the European Union. We finally discuss the combination of voluntary and legislative mechanisms that will secure the global implementation of minimum standards for safe and environmentally sound ship recycling.

Abbreviations

AFS

International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships

COP

Conference of the Parties

CSR

Corporate social responsibility

DASR

Document of Authorization to conduct Ship Recycling

EAF

Electric Arc Furnace

EC

European Commission

EU SRR

European Union Ship Recycling Regulation

EU

European Union

GT

Gross tons

HBCDD

Brominated flame retardant

HKC

Hong Kong International Convention for the safe and environmentally sound recycling of ships, 2009

ICIHM

International Certificate on Inventory of Hazardous Materials

IGO

Inter-governmental Organization

IHM

Inventory of Hazardous Materials

ILO

International Labour Organization, or International Labour Office

IMO

International Maritime Organization

IRRC

International Ready for Recycling Certificate

LDT

Light displacement tonnage

MARPOL

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships

MEP

Member of European Parliament

MEPC

Marine Environment Protection Committee

MoA

Memorandum of Agreement

NGO

Non-governmental organization

OBC

Oxygen blown converter

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

PFOS

Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and its derivatives

SOC

Statement of Compliance

SOLAS

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea

SRFP

Ship Recycling Facility Plan

SRP

Ship Recycling Plan

Notes

Acknowledgments

The photographs used in this chapter are the author’s with the exception of the photographs on Fig. 6.6 (which has been provided by Mrs. Susan Wingfield, Programme Officer of the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam, and Stockholm Conventions), Fig. 6.13 (provided by Dr. Claude Wohrer of the Secrétariat Général de la Mer of the French Prime Minister’s Office), and Fig. 6.16 (provided by Mr. Mohammed Zahirul Islam, Managing Director of PHP Shipbreaking and Recycling Industries Ltd). The chapter draws on material from a booklet produced by GMS (Mikelis 2018).

References

  1. GMS Weekly (issues from 2006 to present). Back issues starting from 7th January.Google Scholar
  2. IHS Global Ltd, World Casualty Statistics. (2017). Table 7C. Also back issues of the same publication from 1998 to 2016.Google Scholar
  3. IHS Maritime & Trade, World Fleet Statistics. (2017). Table 20. Also back issues of the same publication from 2007 to 2016.Google Scholar
  4. IMO. (2017). Status of multilateral conventions and instruments in respect of which the International Maritime Organization or its Secretary-general performs depositary or other functions. International Maritime Organization.Google Scholar
  5. Lloyd’s List. (2018). Import ban on scrap ships deals a heavy blow to Chinese shipbreakers, 4 May.Google Scholar
  6. Mikelis, N. (2007). A statistical overview of ship recycling, International Symposium on Maritime Safety, Security & Environmental Protection (SSE07). Laboratory for Maritime Transport at the National Technical University of Athens, 20–21 September, Athens.Google Scholar
  7. Mikelis, N. (2018). The recycling of ships. http://www.gmsinc.net
  8. Steel Statistical Yearbook. (2017). Also, earlier issues. World Steel Association.Google Scholar
  9. World Steel in Figures. (2018). World Steel Association.Google Scholar
  10. World Steel Recycling in Figures. (2013–2017). Also, earlier issues. Bureau of International Recycling, Ferrous Division.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mikelis ConsultingChiddingly, East SussexUK

Personalised recommendations