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Green Ship Technologies

  • Jan Otto de KatEmail author
  • Jad Mouawad
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides information on green ship technology measures. Included are background information, descriptions of the technologies, explanation of key issues, general pros and cons of each measure, and limits of applicability or effectiveness, as well as practical issues related to implementation. The technical measures described here include the design of energy-efficient ships using hull form optimization, efficient propellers, energy-saving devices, and other novel technologies; attention is paid also to air lubrication, wind-assisted propulsion, and solar power. A subsequent section on machinery systems covers key areas for machinery technology efficiency improvements including the main and auxiliary engines, waste heat recovery systems, auxiliary machinery, and hybrid power storage/production equipment. The last section on ballast water management addresses regulations and provides an overview of ballast water treatment systems and related issues.

Abbreviations

ABS

American Bureau of Shipping

AC

Alternating current

B

Ship beam

BMEP

Brake mean effective pressure

BWM

Ballast water management

BWMS

Ballast water management system

CB

Block coefficient

CFD

Computational fluid dynamics

CO2

Carbon dioxide

Cp

Prismatic coefficient

CPP

Controllable pitch propeller

DC

Direct current

ECA

Emission control area

EGR

Exhaust gas recirculation

ESD

Energy-saving device

FOC

Fuel oil consumption per 24 h

FPP

Fixed pitch propeller

IMO

International Maritime Organization

L

Ship length

LCB

Longitudinal center of buoyancy

MCR

Maximum continuous rating

NOx

Nitrogen oxides

PM

Particulate matter

PTI/PTO

Power take in/power take out

PV

Photo voltaic

RANS

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes

SCR

Selected catalytic reduction

SFOC

Specific fuel oil consumption

T

Ship draft

UV

Ultraviolet

VFD

Variable frequency drive

WHR

Waste heat recovery

Notes

Acknowledgment

The corresponding author would like to thank the American Bureau of Shipping for their permission to use ABS references and graphics, and he would like to extend his gratitude to Mark Penfold for his significant contribution to Sect. 3 (“Machinery Technology”).

Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed in this chapter are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or views of the American Bureau of Shipping.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.American Bureau of ShippingHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Mouawad ConsultingHamarNorway

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