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Menopausal Hot Flashes, Sleep and Mood Disturbances

  • Geena AthappillyEmail author
  • Margo Nathan
Chapter

Abstract

The identification and management of depressive symptoms, hot flashes, and sleep disturbance during menopause first involves a delineation of stage of menopause as the prevalence and management of each symptom may change depending on stage. Menopausal transition is marked by menstrual cycle irregularity and hormonal fluctuations. Depressive symptoms, hot flashes and sleep disturbances are more common during the menopausal transition. Management of the triad of symptoms often entails a careful assessment of the severity of each symptom followed by a consolidated selection of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions designed to target all presenting symptoms. These overlapping interventions may include but are not exclusive of supportive measures, environmental modifications, cognitive behavioral therapy, SNRI’s, SSRI’s, and, in select cases, Hormone Therapy, depending on stage of menopause.

Keywords

Menopause Menopausal transition Hot flashes Sleep Major depression Depressive symptoms Domino theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans HospitalBedfordUSA
  3. 3.Site Director for Boston University Family Medicine Residency at Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veteran Affairs HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.Division of Women’s Mental Health and Department of PsychiatryHarvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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