Advertisement

Introduction: Scholars, Scholarly Archives and the Practice of Scholarship in Late Babylonian Uruk

  • Christine Proust
  • John Steele
Chapter
Part of the Why the Sciences of the Ancient World Matter book series (WSAWM, volume 2)

Abstract

The city of Uruk in southern Babylonian is one of two sites to have provided us with a significant number of scholarly cuneiform tablets from the second half of the first millennium BCE (Fig. 1.1). The contributions to this volume exploit both archaeological and internal textual evidence concerning scholarly archives in Uruk in order to investigate the ways in which different genres of scholarship were practiced, interacted with one-another, and resulted in the production of a written record. This introduction offers a general presentation of the different kinds of collections of tablets on which the different studies rely, for example archives of tablets found by archaeologists in situ, collections in museums, coherent groups which emerge from the analysis of colophons, or sets of texts published in various editions.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement No. 269804.

References

  1. Aaboe, Asger. 1968–1969. Two atypical multiplication tables from Uruk. Journal of Cuneiform Studies 22: 88–91.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  2. Al-Rawi, Farouk N., and Norman A. Roughton. 2003–2004. IM 44152: A Jupiter observational tablet from Uruk. Archiv für Orientforschung 50: 340–344.Google Scholar
  3. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain. 1992. Antiquarian theology in Seleucid Uruk. Acta Sumerologica 14: 47–75.Google Scholar
  4. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain. 1994. Late Babylonian texts in the Nies Babylonian collection. Bethesda, MD: CDL Press.Google Scholar
  5. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain. 1995. Theological and philological speculations on the names of the Goddess Antu. Orientalia 64: 187–213.Google Scholar
  6. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain. 2000. The descendants of Sîn-lêqi-unninni. In Assyriologica et Semitica: Festschrift für Joachim Oelsner, ed. J. Marzahn and H. Neumann, 1–16. Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.Google Scholar
  7. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain. 2003. The Pantheon of Uruk during the Neo-Babylonian period. Leiden: Brill-Styx.Google Scholar
  8. Beaulieu, Paul-Alain, Eckart Frahm, Wayne Horowitz, and John M. Steele. 2018. The cuneiform uranology texts: Drawing the constellations. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.Google Scholar
  9. Clancier, Philippe. 2009. Les bibliothèques en Babylonie dans la deuxième moitié du Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.Google Scholar
  10. Clancier, Philippe, and Julien Monerie. 2014. Les sanctuaires babyloniens à l’époque hellénistique. Évolution d’un relais de pouvoir. TOPOI 19: 181–237.Google Scholar
  11. Clay, Albert T. 1923. Babylonian records in the library of J. Pierpont Morgan. Part IV: Epics, Hymns, Omens, and other texts. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Doty, L. Timothy. 2012. Cuneiform documents from Hellenistic Uruk. Yale Oriental Series, Babylonian Texts 20. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Gabbay, Uri. 2017. ‘Veiled, she circles the city’: A Late Babylonian variation on an Eršema to Inana (VAT 7826). Journal of Near Eastern Studies 76: 275–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. George, Andrew. 1991. Babylonian texts from the folios of Sidney Smith, Part Two: Prognostic and diagnostic omens, Tablet I. Revue d’Assyriologie et d’Archéologie Orientale 85: 137–167.Google Scholar
  15. George, Andrew. 1992. Babylonian topographical texts. Leuven: Peeters.Google Scholar
  16. George, Andrew. 2003. The Babylonian Gilgamesh epic. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Hilgert, Markus. 1998. Drehem Administrative Documents from the Reign of Šulgi. Oriental Institute Publications 115. Chicago: Oriental Institute.Google Scholar
  18. Hunger, Hermann. 1976. Astrologische Wettervorhersagen. Zeitschrift für Assyriologie 66: 234–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hunger, Hermann. 1988. A 3456: eine Sammlung von Merkurbeobachtungen. In A scientific humanist: Studies in memory of Abraham Sachs, ed. E. Leichty, 201–223. Philadelphia: University Museum.Google Scholar
  20. Hunger, Hermann. 1972. Die Tontafeln der XXVII. Kampagne. In XXVI. und XXVII. Vorläufiger Bericht über die von dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut aus Mitteln der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinshaft unternommenen Ausgrabungen in Uruk-Warka. 1968 und 1969, ed. J. Schmidt 79–97. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.Google Scholar
  21. Hunger, Hermann. 2001. Astronomical diaries and related texts from Babylonia. Volume V: Lunar and planetary texts. Vienna: Österreichishe Akademie der Wissenschaften.Google Scholar
  22. Hunger, Hermann. 2014. Astronomical diaries and related texts from Babylonia. Volume VII: Almanacs and normal star Almanacs. Vienna: Österreichishe Akademie der Wissenschaften.Google Scholar
  23. Jordan, Julius. 1928. Uruk-Warka: Nach den Ausgrabungen durch die Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs Buchhandlung.Google Scholar
  24. Jursa, Michael. 2010. Aspects of the economic history of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC. Münster: Ugarit Verlag.Google Scholar
  25. Kessler, Karlheinz. 2003. Zu den Urkunder des achämenidenzeitlichen Archivs W 23292 aus U 18. Baghdader Mitteilungen 34: 235–265.Google Scholar
  26. Kessler, Karlheinz. 2004. Urukäische Familien versus babylonische Familien. Die Namengebund in Uruk, die Degradierung der Kulte von Eanna und der Aufstieg des Gottes Anu. Altorientalische Forschungen 31: 237–262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Kose, Arno. 1998. Uruk Architektur IV. Von der Seleukiden- bis zur Sasanidenzeit. Mainz: Philipp von Zabern.Google Scholar
  28. Kraus, Fritz R. 1947. Die Istanbuler Tontafelsammlung. Journal of Cuneiform Studies 1: 93–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Lackenbacher, Sylvie. 1977. Un Nouveau Fragment de la « Fȇte d’Ištar ». Revue d’Assyriologie et d’Archéologie Orientale 71: 39–50.Google Scholar
  30. Lafont, Bertrand. 1984. La collection des tablettes cunéiformes des Musées archéologiques d’Istanbul. Travaux et recherches en Turquie, Turcica 4: 179–185.Google Scholar
  31. Lenzen, Heinrich J. 1962. XVIII. vorläufiger Bericht über die von dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut und der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft aus Mittein der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft unternommenen Ausgrabungen in Uruk-Warka: Winter 1959/60. Berlin: Gebr. Mann.Google Scholar
  32. Lindström, Gunvor. 2003. Uruk: Siegelabdrücke auf hellenistischen Tonbullen und Tontafeln. Mainz am Rhein: Philipp von Zabern.Google Scholar
  33. Linssen, Marc J. 2004. The cults of Uruk and Babylon: The temple ritual texts as evidence for Hellenistic Cult practices. Leiden: Brill-Styx.Google Scholar
  34. Neugebauer, Otto. 1935. Mathematische Keilschrift Texte I. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  35. Neugebauer, Otto. 1955. Astronomical cuneiform texts. London: Lund Humphries.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Ossendrijver, Mathieu. 2011a. Exzellente Netzwerke: die Astronomen von Uruk. In The empirical dimension of Ancient Near Eastern studies, ed. G.J. Selz and K. Wagensonner, 631–644. Vienna: LIT-Verlag.Google Scholar
  37. Ossendrijver, Mathieu. 2011b. Science in action: Networks in Babylonian astronomy. In Babylon: Wissenskultur in Orient und Okzident, ed. E. Cancik-Kirschbaum, M. van Ess, and J. Marzahn, 229–237. Berlin: de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  38. Pearce, Laurie E., and L.T. Doty. 2000. The activities of Anu-belšunu, Seleucid scribe. In Assyriologica et Semitica: Festschrift für Joachim Oelsner, ed. J. Marzahn and H. Neumann, 331–342. Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.Google Scholar
  39. Pedersén, Olof. 1998. Archives and libraries in the Ancient Near East 1500–300 B.C. Bethesda: CDL Press.Google Scholar
  40. Robson, Eleanor. 2008. Mathematics in ancient Iraq: A social history. Princeton: Princeton University Press.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  41. Robson, Eleanor. 2011. The production and dissemination of scholarly knowledge. In The Oxford handbook of cuneiform culture, ed. K. Radner and E. Robson, 557–576. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Robson, Eleanor. 2013. Reading the libraries of Assyria and Babylonia. In Ancient libraries, ed. J. König, K. Oikonompolou, and G. Woolf, 38–56. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Rochberg, Francesca. 1998. Babylonian horoscopes. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Sachs, Abraham. 1952. Babylonian horoscopes. Journal of Cuneiform Studies 6: 49–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Sachs, Abraham J., and Hermann Hunger. 1988. Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia. Volume I. Diaries from 652 B.C. to 262 B.C. Vienna: Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften.Google Scholar
  46. Sarkisian, Gagik Kh. 1974. New cuneiform texts from Uruk of the Seleucid period in the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Forschungen und Berichte 16: 15–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Schaumberger, Johann. 1955. Anaphora und Aufgangskalender in neuen Ziqpu-Texten. Zeitschrift für Assyriologie 52: 237–251.Google Scholar
  48. Schroeder, Otto. 1916. Vorderasiatische Schriftdenkmäler der Königlichen Museen zu Berlin, Heft XV, Kontrakte der Seleukidenzeit aus Warka. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs Buchhandlung.Google Scholar
  49. Steele, John M. 2000. A 3405: An unusual astronomical text from Uruk. Archive for History of Exact Sciences 55: 103–135.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  50. Steele, John M. 2005. A new scheme from Uruk for the retrograde Arc of Mars. Journal of Cuneiform Studies 57: 129–133.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  51. Steele, John M. 2016. The circulation of astronomical knowledge between Babylon and Uruk. In The circulation of astronomical knowledge in the ancient world, ed. J.M. Steele, 93–118. Leiden: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Steele, John M. 2017. Rising time schemes in Babylonian astronomy. Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Thureau-Dangin, François. 1938. Textes mathématiques babyloniens transcrits et traduits. Leiden: Brill.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  54. Thureau-Dangin, François. 1922. Tablettes d’Uruk à l’usage des prêtres du Temple d’Anu au temps des Séleucides. Textes Cunéiformes du Louvre 6. Paris: Geuthner.Google Scholar
  55. van der Spek, Robartus J. 1987. The Babylonian city. In Hellenism in the East: The interaction of Greek and non-Greek civilizations from Syria to Central Asia after Alexander, ed. A. Kuhrt and S. Sherwin-White, 57–74. London: Duckworth.Google Scholar
  56. van Dijk, Johannes. 1962. Die Inschriftendunde: Die Tontafeln aus dem rēš-Heiligtum. In XVIII. vorläufiger Bericht über die von dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut und der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft aus Mitteln der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft unternommenen Ausgrabungen in Uruk-Warka: Winter 1959/60, ed. H. Lenzen, 43–61. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.Google Scholar
  57. van Dijk, Johannes, and Walter R. Mayer. 1980. Texte aus dem Rēš-Heiligtum in Uruk-Warka. Baghdader Mitteilungen Beiheft 2. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.Google Scholar
  58. von Weiher, Egbert. 1979. Die Tontafelfunde der 29. u. 30. Kampagne. In XXIX. und XXX. Vorläufiger Bericht über die von dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut aus Mitteln der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinshaft unternommenen Ausgrabungen in Uruk-Warka. 1970/71 und 1971/72, ed. J. Schmidt, 95–111. Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.Google Scholar
  59. Waerzeggers, Caroline. 2003–2004. The Babylonian revolts against Xerxes and the ‘end of archives’. Archiv für Orientforschung 50: 150–173.Google Scholar
  60. Weidner, Ernst F. 1915. Handbuch der Babylonischen Astronomie. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs Buchhandlung.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  61. Weidner, Ernst F. 1925. Ein astrologischer Kommentar aus Uruk. Studia Orientalia 1: 347–358.Google Scholar
  62. Weidner, Ernst F. 1941–1944a. Die astrologische Serie Enûma Anu Enlil. Archiv für Orientforschung 14: 172–195.Google Scholar
  63. Weidner, Ernst F. 1941–1944b. Die astrologische Serie Enûma Anu Enlil. Archiv für Orientforschung 14: 308–318.Google Scholar
  64. Weidner, Ernst F. 1954–1956. Die astrologische Serie Enûma Anu Enlil. Archiv für Orientforschung 17: 71–89.Google Scholar
  65. Weidner, Ernst F. 1967. Gestirn-Darstellungen auf babylonischen Tontafeln. Vienna: Hermann Böhlaus.Google Scholar
  66. Weisberg, David B. 1991. The Late Babylonian texts of the Oriental Institute collection. Malibu: Undena.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratoire SPHERE—UMR 7219CNRS & Université Paris DiderotParis Cedex 13France
  2. 2.Department of Egyptology and AssyriologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

Personalised recommendations