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Problems with Obtaining Materials for the Protection of Integrated Circuits from High-Velocity Streams of Microparticles and Possible Solutions

  • Anatoly Belous
  • Vitali Saladukha
  • Siarhei Shvedau
Chapter

Abstract

In outer space, the radio-electronic equipment of the on-board control systems of satellites, orbital automatic and manned stations, re-entry apparatuses, various “probes,” “lunar vehicles,” and “Mars vehicles,” apart from the extreme mechanical and temperature influences of radiation, is prone to the negative influence of so-called space dust—clouds (“clots”) of microparticles, traveling at velocities from one thousand to many thousands of kilometers per second and colliding with different obstacles (body of a space vehicle, packages, chips of semiconductor microcircuits, etc.), suggesting the origin of the earlier unknown physical effects and deteriorating the reliability of the on-board control systems functioning.

Keywords

Electromagnetic irradiation Multilayer film shield Space dust On-board control system Failures of spacecraft 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anatoly Belous
    • 1
  • Vitali Saladukha
    • 1
  • Siarhei Shvedau
    • 1
  1. 1.IntegralMinskBelarus

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