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Energy Relations Between the EU and Russia

  • Lukáš Tichý
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter details the main aspects of the EU-Russia energy relations. Although the monograph primarily focuses on the ideological (discursive) level of the energy interactions between the EU and Russia, the importance of the institutional and material (nondiscursive) level of the EU–RF energy relations cannot be wholly ignored in the discussion of this issue. In this context, the chapter is divided into several parts. The first describes the legislative and institutional framework of the energy relations between the EU and Russia. The second and third parts analyse the energy policies of the EU and the RF, with primary attention given to the key actors and the basic goals, instruments, and interests of the EU and RF energy policies. The final section focuses on the Ukrainian crisis in 2014 and its impact on the further development of the energy relations between the EU and Russia.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Lukáš Tichý
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of International RelationsPragueCzech Republic

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