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The Global Goal of Sustainable Growth

  • David E. McNabbEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces some of the major water-related challenges societies around the globe face in their efforts to achieve and maintain sustainable supplies of freshwater. It is also a discussion of some of the paths that some of the most threatened water suppliers are following in their efforts to overcome these barriers.

Keywords

Water sustainability Water scarcity Water security Sustainable development  

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pacific Lutheran UniversityTacomaUSA

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