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After the Coalition: Towards a Transformation or Consolidation of British Capitalism?

  • Scott LaveryEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Building a Sustainable Political Economy: SPERI Research & Policy book series (SPERIRP)

Abstract

In the decade following the 2008 crisis, a populist insurgency engulfed the advanced capitalist world. Britain embodies a pivotal sphere within this wider global reconfiguration. Three core developments reshaped British politics in the two years after the Coalition: the rise of Brexit, the May government and Corbynism. Each of these political forms of course has its own history and future trajectory. But each also embodies a distinctive form of ‘post-crisis British politics’ in the sense that each emerged out of the post-crisis context and each pledged, in different ways, to initiate a far-reaching programme of social and economic reform. Whether these post-crisis reconfigurations will ultimately bring about a transformation or a consolidation of British capitalism remains an open question.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI)University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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