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Using School-Wide Collaborative Lesson Research to Implement Standards and Improve Student Learning: Models and Preliminary Results

  • Akihiko TakahashiEmail author
  • Thomas McDougal
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Mathematics Education book series (AME)

Abstract

Many schools in America have been working to implement the new common standards for mathematics. In Japan, Lesson Study is used to incorporate revised national standards in the classroom. While there are many projects related to Lesson Study outside of Japan, they have met with varying degrees of success, often because they diverge from authentic Japanese Lesson Study. This chapter is built upon an article we wrote that appeared in ZDM in 2016. We developed Collaborative Lesson Research (CLR) for classrooms outside of Japan, based on Japanese Lesson Study. We have been piloting CLR projects in American and Qatari schools. Some schools had teachers who had at least some experience with Lesson Study, while other schools had no prior experience with Lesson Study. We are developing models to introduce CLR to both kinds of schools. We believe that the initial success of these projects shows that CLR may be used on a school-wide scale to implement new standards and improve student learning.

Keywords

Lesson Study CCSS-M Collaborative Lesson Research 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This publication is based in part on a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The findings and conclusions contained within are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

This publication is based in part on a project funded by the Qatar Petrochemical Company (QAPCO). The findings and conclusions contained within are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of QAPCO.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of EducationDePaul UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Lesson Study AllianceChicagoUSA

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