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A Top-Down Narrative Design Approach for Networked Cultural Institutions

  • Tonguc Ibrahim SezenEmail author
  • Ido Iurgel
  • Nicolas Fischöder
  • René Bakker
  • Koen van Turnhout
  • Digdem Sezen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11318)

Abstract

In 2020 the RheijnLand.Xperiences project will connect 8 museums along the Dutch-German border by a network using a story-driven application for mobile devices for an audience between the ages of 14 and 22. While the project foresees the design of individually tailored experiences for each museum, an overarching narrative and experience structure is also required to establish connections between the museums. This structure relies heavily on the concepts of interactive digital storytelling and is required to compensate the environmental and thematic diversity of each museum while also enriching the overall experience of visiting multiple museums in the network. In this regard in this poster, we summarize our approach and core elements of the “universal” narrative and experience design.

Keywords

Continuation network Narrative design Secondary world Museum 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ido Iurgel
    • 1
  • Nicolas Fischöder
    • 1
  • René Bakker
    • 2
  • Koen van Turnhout
    • 2
  • Digdem Sezen
    • 3
  1. 1.Rhine-Waal University of Applied SciencesKamp-LintfortGermany
  2. 2.Hogeschool van Arnhem en NijmegenArnhemThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Istanbul Universitesi, İletişim FakültesiİstanbulTurkey

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