Advertisement

A Framework for Classifying and Describing Authoring Tools for Interactive Digital Narrative

  • Yotam Shibolet
  • Noam Knoller
  • Hartmut KoenitzEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11318)

Abstract

Authoring tools are a crucial component in the practice and research of interactive digital narrative design, yet no recent meta-analysis or mapping of such tools exists that would make it possible to comparatively study their defining qualities and characteristics and their effects on the artefacts produced with them. As a first step towards this goal, we created an online resource [1] in which we surveyed and classified over 300 tools. This paper lays out our proposed categorisation and description framework for IDN authoring tools. After exploring our definition of authoring tools and research methodology, we describe 9 categories and 38 descriptors for tool analysis and comparison. We conclude with a sample analysis of Twine [2].

Keywords

Authoring tools Interactive digital narrative Interactive narrative design Interface Twine 

References

  1. 1.
    IDN Authoring Tools Resource. interactivenarrativedesign.org/authoringtools/appendix.pdf. Accessed 25 July 2018Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Twine. http://twinery.org/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  3. 3.
    Bolter, J.D.: Personal communication with Hartmut KoenitzGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Koenitz, H., Dubbelman, T., Knoller, N., Roth, C.: An integrated and iterative research direction for interactive digital narrative. In: Nack, F., Gordon, Andrew S. (eds.) ICIDS 2016. LNCS, vol. 10045, pp. 51–60. Springer, Cham (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48279-8_5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Heidegger, M.: The question concerning technology. Technol. Values Essent. Read. 99, 113 (1954)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Maher, J.: Eamon, part I, September 2011. https://www.filfre.net/2011/09/eamon-part-1/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  7. 7.
    Maher, J.: The Quill, July 2013. https://www.filfre.net/2013/07/the-quill/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  8. 8.
    Sharples, M.: Cognition, computers and creative writing. Diss. University of Edinburgh (1984)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Conklin, J.: Hypertext: an introduction and survey. Computer 20(9), 17–41 (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Theng, Y.L., Jones, M., Thimbleby, H.W.: Designer tools for hypertext authoring (1995)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Bolter, J.D., Joyce, M.: Hypertext and creative writing. In: Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Hypertext. ACM (1987)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mateas, M.: An Oz-centric review of interactive drama and believable agents. In: Wooldridge, M.J., Veloso, M. (eds.) Artificial Intelligence Today. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 1600, pp. 297–328. Springer, Heidelberg (1999).  https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-48317-9_12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Brooks, K.M.: Metalinear cinematic narrative: theory, process, and tool. Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1999)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Magerko, B.: A comparative analysis of story representations for interactive narrative systems. In: AIIDE (2007)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Roberts, D.L., Isbell, C.L.: A survey and qualitative analysis of recent advances in drama management. Int. Trans. Syst. Sci. Appl. Spec. Issue Agent Based Syst. Hum. Learn. 4(2), 61–75 (2008)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Arinbjarnar, M., Barber, H., Kudenko, D.: A critical review of interactive drama systems. In: AISB 2009 Symposium. AI & Games, Edinburgh (2009)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Riedl, M.O.: A comparison of interactive narrative system approaches using human improvisational actors. In: Proceedings of the Intelligent Narrative Technologies III Workshop. ACM (2010)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Koenitz, H.: Extensible tools for practical experiments in IDN: the advanced stories authoring and presentation system. In: Si, M., et al. (eds.) ICIDS 2011. LNCS, vol. 7069, pp. 79–84. Springer, Heidelberg (2011).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-25289-1_9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Koenitz, H., Chen, K.-J.: Genres, structures and strategies in interactive digital narratives – analyzing a body of works created in ASAPS. In: Oyarzun, D., Peinado, F., Young, R.M., Elizalde, A., Méndez, G. (eds.) ICIDS 2012. LNCS, vol. 7648, pp. 84–95. Springer, Heidelberg (2012).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-34851-8_8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Spierling, U., Weiß, S.A., Müller, W.: Towards accessible authoring tools for interactive storytelling. In: Göbel, S., Malkewitz, R., Iurgel, I. (eds.) TIDSE 2006. LNCS, vol. 4326, pp. 169–180. Springer, Heidelberg (2006).  https://doi.org/10.1007/11944577_17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Fernandez-Vara, C.: Tools to Make Narrative Games. VagrantCursor, January 2018. https://vagrantcursor.wordpress.com/2018/01/02/tools-to-make-narrative-games/. Accessed 24 July 24 2018
  22. 22.
    StoryChoices (StoryNexus) Wiki. “Story Platforms”. http://wiki.failbettergames.com/story-platforms. Accessed 24 July 2018
  23. 23.
    Short, E.: IF Tool Development in General. Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling, February 2017. https://emshort.blog/2017/02/21/if-tool-development-in-general/. Accessed July 24 2018
  24. 24.
    Another Interactive Fiction Engine List. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-B1yKIateTpwTdRNT9W_ZjDzC6XnFpHXrcZ4nr_x7LQ/edit#gid=0. Accessed 24 July 2018
  25. 25.
    Knoller, N.: The expressive space of IDS-as-art. In: Oyarzun, D., Peinado, F., Young, R.M., Elizalde, A., Méndez, G. (eds.) ICIDS 2012. LNCS, vol. 7648, pp. 30–41. Springer, Heidelberg (2012).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-34851-8_3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Knoller, N., Ben-Arie, U.: The holodeck is all around us—interface dispositifs in interactive digital storytelling. In: Koenitz, H., et al. (eds.) Interactive Digital Narrative - History, Theory and Practice, pp. 67-82. Routledge, New York (2015)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Knoller, N.: Complexity and the userly text. In: Grishakova, M., Poulaki, M. (eds.) Narrative Complexity - Cognition, Embodiment, Evolution. Nebraska University Press, Lincoln, Nebraska (2019, forthcoming)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Unity. https://unity3d.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  29. 29.
    Unreal Game Engine. https://www.unrealengine.com/en-US/what-is-unreal-engine-4. Accessed 24 July 2018
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
    Adventuregamesstudios. http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  32. 32.
    Ren’Py. https://www.renpy.org/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  33. 33.
    Kirikiri, Z. https://github.com/krkrz/krkrz. Accessed 24 July 2018
  34. 34.
    ASAPS. http://advancedstories.net/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  35. 35.
  36. 36.
    Szilas, N.: IDtension: a narrative engine for Interactive Drama. In: Proceedings of the Technologies for Interactive Digital Storytelling and Entertainment (TIDSE) Conference, vol. 3, no. 2 (2003)Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    StorySpace. http://www.eastgate.com/storyspace/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  38. 38.
    Bernstein, M.: Storyspace: Hypertext and the Process of Writing. In: Hypertext/Hypermedia Handbook. McGraw-Hill, Inc., Hightstown (1991)Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Infrom7. http://inform7.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  40. 40.
    VaryTale. https://varytale.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  41. 41.
    Short, E.: So, Do We Need This Parser Thing Anyways?. Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling, June 2010. https://emshort.blog/2010/06/07/so-do-we-need-this-parser-thing-anyway/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  42. 42.
    Klynt. http://www.klynt.net/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  43. 43.
    Korsakow. http://korsakow.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  44. 44.
    Soar, M.: Making (with) the Korsakow system. In: New Documentary Ecologies, pp. 154–173. Palgrave Macmillan, London (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    ARis. https://fielddaylab.org/make/aris/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  46. 46.
    StoryPlaces. http://storyplaces.soton.ac.uk/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  47. 47.
    Millard, D.E., Hargood, C., Howard, Y., Packer, H.: The StoryPlaces Authoring Tool: pattern centric authoring. In: Authoring for Interactive Storytelling (2017)Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    SceneVR. https://scene.knightlab.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  49. 49.
    VRDoodler. http://vrdoodler.com/. Accessed 24 July 2018
  50. 50.
    Bizzocchi, J., Ben Lin, M.A., Tanenbaum, J.: Games, narrative and the design of interface. Int. J. Arts Technol. 4(4), 460–479 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    Dubbelman, T.: Narrative game mechanics. In: Nack, F., Gordon, Andrew S. (eds.) ICIDS 2016. LNCS, vol. 10045, pp. 39–50. Springer, Cham (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48279-8_4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    Shibolet, Y.: Game Movement as Enactive Focalization. Press Start 4.2, pp. 51–71 (2018)Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Kirsh, D.: Embodied cognition and the magical future of interaction design. ACM Trans. Comput. Hum. Interact. (TOCHI) 20(1), 3 (2013)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    Norman, D.A.: Natural user interfaces are not natural. Interactions 17(3), 6–10 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Utrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.HKU University of the Arts UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations