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Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in Children and Adolescents

  • Diana Cândea
  • Simona Stefan
  • Silviu Matu
  • Cristina Mogoase
  • Felicia Iftene
  • Daniel David
  • Aurora Szentagotai
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Psychology book series (BRIEFSPSYCHOL)

Abstract

In this chapter, we will introduce the principles and structure of a group-delivered REBT treatment protocol designed for depressed children and adolescents. The protocol was already tested in a clinical trial, comparing group REBT, medication (i.e., sertraline), and their combination in treating youth depression by considering multiple levels of analysis (i.e., cognitive, subjective, and biological – serum serotonin and norepinephrine), and the results have already been published (Iftene, Predescu, Stefan, & David, 2015).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diana Cândea
    • 1
  • Simona Stefan
    • 1
  • Silviu Matu
    • 1
  • Cristina Mogoase
    • 1
  • Felicia Iftene
    • 2
  • Daniel David
    • 1
    • 3
  • Aurora Szentagotai
    • 1
  1. 1.Babeș–Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Queens UniversityKingstonCanada
  3. 3.Ichan School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA

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