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Community-Based Strategies to Address Homelessness

  • Diane R. BesselEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Housing providers, advocates, and municipalities have been regularly called upon to develop community-based strategies to remedy the complex problem of homelessness. The push toward greater community involvement started in the 1980s with the introduction of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Continuum of Care model and continued into the 2000s with the advent of Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS). More recently, communities have been required to engage in 10-year planning processes to address chronic homelessness and to develop innovative coordinated entry and assessment systems. In doing so, community members engage a wide variety of skills from research and service linkage to planning, policy-making, evaluation, and collaborative problem-solving. This chapter examines these community-based strategies to address homelessness – describing their key strengths as well as unintended consequences. The chapter also draws on organizational theory and illustrates key concepts using a series of case study vignettes.

Keywords

Continuum of care Emergency Food and Shelter Program (EFSP) Emergency Shelter Grants/Emergency Solutions Grants US Department of Housing and Urban Development Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act) Interagency Council on the Homeless /Interagency Council on Homelessness Supported Housing Program Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) National Alliance to End Homelessness (NAEH) Chronic homelessness 10-year plans to end chronic homelessness Housing First Rapid Re-housing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP) Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act Coordinated entry and assessment 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Daemen CollegeAmherstUSA

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