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Privacy Failures and Recovery Strategies

  • Robert W. PalmatierEmail author
  • Kelly D. Martin
Chapter

Abstract

Data breach events are reported on a regular basis. The nonprofit Privacy Rights Clearinghouse calculates there have been nearly 1 trillion compromised personal records from data breaches to date, since it began tracking publicly announced events in 2005. What makes this number particularly staggering is that the scope of most data breach events is unknown, and the extent and number of compromised records simply cannot be quantified.1 The Identity Theft Resource Center, publishing in conjunction with the U.S. government, also tracks thousands of data breaches and estimates that they have cost firms hundreds of millions of dollars in lost sales and recovery costs, even before accounting for their damages to long-term performance and reputations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Foster School of BusinessUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Colorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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