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Constructing Bibliometric Networks from Spanish Doctoral Theses

  • V. Duarte-Martínez
  • A. G. López-Herrera
  • M. J. Cobo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11315)

Abstract

The bibliometric networks as representations of complex systems provide great information that allow discovering different aspects of the behavior and interaction between the participants of the network. In this contribution we have built a fairly large bibliometric network based on data from Spanish doctoral theses. Specifically, we have used the data of each theses defense committee to build the network with its members and we have conducted a study to discover how the nodes of this network interact, to know which are the most representative and how they are grouped within communities according to their participation in theses defense committee.

Keywords

Science mapping analysis Bibliographic network Co-committee members Spanish theses Computer science 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge FEDER fund under grant TIN2016-75850-R.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Facultad de Ingeniería en Electricidad y ComputaciónEscuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral, ESPOLGuayaquilEcuador
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science and Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  3. 3.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringUniversity of CádizCádizSpain

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