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Skin and Mucosal Immune System

  • Vladimir V. Klimov
Chapter

Abstract

The skin and mucosal level of the immune system where most immune processes take place is described. The reader can find some new data concerning the tissue-specific homeostatic cytokines, which make cells of the immune system move in the certain skin and mucosal departments. This important topic is often absent in immunology manuals.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir V. Klimov
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Immunology and Allergy DepartmentSiberian State Medical UniversityTomskRussia

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