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Behavioral Approaches to Language Training for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Jason C. VladescuEmail author
  • Samantha L. Breeman
  • Kathleen E. Marano
  • Jacqueline N. Carrow
  • Alexandra M. Campanaro
  • April N. Kisamore
Chapter

Abstract

Behavior analysis is among the most sought-after early-intervention programs for children with developmental disabilities, with language training being a common primary objective. Many early-intervention programs subscribe to a traditional conceptualization of language skills and focus on developing a robust vocabulary. Conversely, Skinner's (Verbal behavior. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1957) conceptualization of language emphasized the function of an individual’s language use rather than the topography. To assist in understanding Skinner’s conceptualization, this chapter is designed to introduce readers to four elementary verbal operants (i.e., mands, tacts, echoics, and intraverbals). In doing so, we provide a definition for each operant, outline the importance of and specific environmental variables responsible for each, provide some basic guidelines for teaching, and discuss their implications for practitioners.

Keywords

Echoic Intraverbal Mand Tact Verbal behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason C. Vladescu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Samantha L. Breeman
    • 1
  • Kathleen E. Marano
    • 1
  • Jacqueline N. Carrow
    • 1
  • Alexandra M. Campanaro
    • 1
  • April N. Kisamore
    • 2
  1. 1.Caldwell UniversityCaldwellUSA
  2. 2.Hunter CollegeNew YorkUSA

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