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PCIT and Autism: A Case Study

  • Amelia M. Rowley
  • Joshua J. MasseEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Behavioral difficulties are widely recognized in children on the autism spectrum. Research has demonstrated that up to 80% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) present with a range of comorbid difficulties, and up to 37% meet full diagnostic criteria for a disruptive behavior disorder. Left untreated, behavioral difficulties persist and can result in social isolation as well as exclusion in educational and community settings. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an evidence-based treatment for externalizing behavior disorders, has been empirically shown to ameliorate problem behaviors while increasing positive parenting behaviors and prosocial behaviors for children with ASD. The following case study further extends the literature by showing positive behavior and social outcomes for a 4-year-old boy with ASD at posttreatment and 3-month follow-up. In addition, through the lens of this individual case, the manuscript examines the general application of PCIT with the ASD population from a theoretical, therapeutic coaching, and case management perspective.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Externalizing behaviors Behavioral treatment Early childhood 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge Elizabeth Wolock for her contributions to the manuscript, Mason and his family for their dedication to one another, and all the PCIT clinicians who continue to work effortlessly with children on the autism spectrum and their families.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Boston Child Study CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.University of Massachusetts DartmouthNorth DartmouthUSA

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