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PCIT for Children with Severe Behavior Problems and Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Korrie Allen
  • John W. Harrington
  • Cathy Cooke
Chapter

Abstract

Several evidence-based therapies are available for children with disruptive behavior; however, few have been studied among children with ASD and co-occurring behavioral difficulties. The purpose of this chapter is to review the effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in reducing disruptive behaviors among school-age children (4–12 years) with ASD. Forty-four children were enrolled in the study: 19 in the control group and 25 in the PCIT treatment group. Participants in the intervention group received the manual-based PCIT treatment weekly (60–90 min) for approximately 14–16 weeks. Control group participants maintained community treatment for the duration of the study. Parent-reported and observational measures of child behavior and compliance, parental distress, and parental mental health were administered at baseline, interim treatment (10 weeks), and posttreatment (14 weeks). The results indicated that children in the treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in disruptive behaviors and improvement in compliance compared to children in the control group. Exploratory analyses revealed a differential treatment response based on ASD severity. These results demonstrate that PCIT can be effectively translated to children with ASD and disruptive behavior.

Keywords

Parent Child Interaction Therapy Autism spectrum disorder Children Disruptive behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Korrie Allen
    • 1
  • John W. Harrington
    • 2
    • 3
  • Cathy Cooke
    • 4
  1. 1.Innovative Psychological SolutionsFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.Children’s Hospital of The King’s DaughtersNorfolkUSA
  3. 3.Eastern Virginia Medical SchoolNorfolkUSA
  4. 4.Clinical Associates of TidewaterNewport NewsUSA

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