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Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Narrative Review

  • Christopher K. OwenEmail author
  • Jocelyn Stokes
  • Ria Travers
  • Mary M. Ruckle
  • Corey Lieneman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews, in detail, all Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) studies for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and provides information to improve clinical expertise and inform effective practice. Even though PCIT was originally developed to treat children with externalizing behaviors, there has been increased interest in using this evidence-based treatment (EBT) with children on the spectrum. Two theoretical articles, seven nonexperimental studies, and four quasi-experimental and experimental studies comprise the entire literature of PCIT for children with ASD (PCIT-ASD). These studies lay the groundwork necessary to inform future researchers and clinicians interested in PCIT-ASD.

Keywords

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) Adaptations Evidence-based treatments Disruptive behaviors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher K. Owen
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Jocelyn Stokes
    • 3
  • Ria Travers
    • 4
  • Mary M. Ruckle
    • 2
  • Corey Lieneman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.West Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA
  3. 3.West Virginia University School of Medicine—Eastern DivisionMartinsburgUSA
  4. 4.Georgia Pediatric PsychologyAtlantaUSA

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