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Aspirin Administration for Control of Tumor Millimetric Residual

  • Alberto Campione
  • Guglielmo Cacciotti
  • Raffaelino Roperto
  • Carlo Giacobbo Scavo
  • Luciano Mastronardi
Chapter

Abstract

New details about the role of proinflammatory pathways in the molecular pathogenesis of vestibular schwannoma have inspired the researchers to experiment aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of the tumor. Encouraging evidences have been reported in clinical studies. However, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial is still missing and needed to ultimately address the efficacy of aspirin as a cytostatic on vestibular schwannoma and its correct posology. Second and even more ambitious target would be application of aspirin as a cytostatic for secondary prevention of tumor growth. In the personal experience, nine patients have undergone subtotal tumor resection and have been prescribed postoperative aspirin off-label with the purpose of avoiding recurrences. The maximum follow-up period has been 47 months, and only the first patient needed reoperation due to tumor regrowth; the remaining eight patients are being followed up and show stable tumors.

Keywords

Vestibular schwannoma/emerging therapies Vestibular schwannoma/aspirin Vestibular schwannoma/NSAIDs Vestibular schwannoma/tumor residue 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Campione
    • 1
  • Guglielmo Cacciotti
    • 1
  • Raffaelino Roperto
    • 1
  • Carlo Giacobbo Scavo
    • 1
  • Luciano Mastronardi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgerySan Filippo Neri Hospital—ASLRoma1RomeItaly

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