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“Will the Last One Out, Please Turn off the Lights”: Promoting Energy Awareness in Public Areas of Office Buildings

  • Joëlle CoutazEmail author
  • Antonin Carlesso
  • Nicolas Bonnefond
  • Raffaella Balzarini
  • Yann Laurillau
  • Nadine Mandran
  • James L. Crowley
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11249)

Abstract

Most previous research in sustainable HCI has focused on electricity consumption in domestic environments or private office spaces. Here, we address use of lighting in public areas of office buildings with the goal of understanding and measuring how calm technologies can inspire positive engagement by promoting awareness and competition. We have conducted a 15-month study with the design, deployment, and assessment of two complementary ambient apparatus (one centralized, one distributed) in an office building occupied by ICT start-up companies. Our results show that calm technology can be effective under specific conditions, resulting in a significant reduction of average electricity consumption. We also discovered that in the absence of automatic controls, approximately 25% of lighting consumption occurred during off-work hours.

Keywords

Eco-feedback Ambient display Calm technology Energy consumption awareness Persuasive technology Sustainable HCI Human-Building interaction Office building 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was made possible with the support of the EquipEx AmiQual4Home ANR-11-EQPX-00 and the ANR-15-IDEX-02 as the cross-disciplinary project Eco-SESA. We thank the occupants of the building for their participation as well as Daniel Llerena, professor in experimental economy, for suggesting the friendly competition game approach, and M. Yuiko, D. Shiffman, and R. Chao for their contribution to the particles and the tree available from the Processing web site [19].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joëlle Coutaz
    • 1
    Email author
  • Antonin Carlesso
    • 2
  • Nicolas Bonnefond
    • 2
  • Raffaella Balzarini
    • 2
  • Yann Laurillau
    • 1
  • Nadine Mandran
    • 1
  • James L. Crowley
    • 2
  1. 1.Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble INP, LIGGrenobleFrance
  2. 2.Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble INPGrenobleFrance

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