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Sustainable Climate-Smart Agricultural Solutions to Improve Food and Nutrition Security in Trinidad and Tobago

  • Wendy-Ann IsaacEmail author
  • Nkosi Felix
  • Wayne G. Ganpat
  • Duraisamy Saravanakumar
  • Jessica Churaman
Chapter

Abstract

Agriculture in Trinidad and Tobago is always challenging. The sector has always been under-resourced and more so in these recessionary times. Food and nutrition insecurity is compounded by increased vulnerability to changing weather events, disasters, land degradation, pests and disease incidences, inefficient and outdated technologies in food production and processing, and low investments in research. The result is a high food import bill. In this chapter, sustainable agriculture intensification as well as climate-smart agriculture technologies that have the potential to mitigate many of the challenges facing agricultural development are presented with the focus on making Trinidad and Tobago more climate resilient and self-sufficient in food. Policies and recommendations, which play key roles, are suggested. Such a transformative path may seem a daunting challenge in light of political volatility and continuity every five years, but this chapter seeks to offer alternative pathways for the agricultural sector in Trinidad and Tobago.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy-Ann Isaac
    • 1
    Email author
  • Nkosi Felix
    • 2
  • Wayne G. Ganpat
    • 2
  • Duraisamy Saravanakumar
    • 1
  • Jessica Churaman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Food ProductionThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Economics and ExtensionThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago

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