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Generalized Error-Correcting Sample Preparation

  • Zipeng Li
  • Krishnendu Chakrabarty
  • Tsung-Yi Ho
  • Chen-Yi Lee
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, digital microfluidic biochips (DMFBs) have been adopted as a platform for sample preparation. However, there remain two major problems associated with sample preparation on a conventional DMFB. First, only a (1:1) mixing/splitting model can be used, leading to an increase in the number of fluidic operations required for sample preparation. Second, only a limited number of sensors can be integrated on a conventional DMFB; as a result, the latency for error detection during sample preparation is significant. To overcome these drawbacks, this chapter adopts micro-electrode-dot-array (MEDA) biochips for sample preparation. This chapter proposes the first sample preparation method that exploits the MEDA-specific advantages of fine-grained control of droplet sizes and real-time droplet sensing. Experimental demonstration using a fabricated MEDA biochip and simulation results highlight the effectiveness of the proposed sample-preparation method.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zipeng Li
    • 1
  • Krishnendu Chakrabarty
    • 2
  • Tsung-Yi Ho
    • 3
  • Chen-Yi Lee
    • 4
  1. 1.Intel (United States)Santa ClaraUSA
  2. 2.Department of ECEDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  3. 3.National Tsing Hua UniversityHsinchuTaiwan
  4. 4.National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchuTaiwan

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