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State of the Art

  • Filipe Calegario
Chapter
Part of the Computational Synthesis and Creative Systems book series (CSACS)

Abstract

This chapter presents initiatives in DMI literature such as concepts, principles, frameworks, and processes that can be related to DMI design, and, specifically, we look for structured steps for idea exploration. Then we analyze commercial products and DMI literature in search for prototyping tools that can be suited for DMI prototyping phase.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Filipe Calegario
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Informática (CIn-UFPE)Federal University of PernambucoRecifeBrazil

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