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Challenges in Designing DMIs

  • Filipe Calegario
Chapter
Part of the Computational Synthesis and Creative Systems book series (CSACS)

Abstract

This chapter examines the concept of DMI and discusses a list of illustrative challenges one might face when conceiving and building these artifacts. The list is not comprehensive, but it attests the complexity of the area. Finally, we discuss why it is important to have various cycles of experimentation and implementation during the development of a new DMI.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Filipe Calegario
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Informática (CIn-UFPE)Federal University of PernambucoRecifeBrazil

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