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The Measurement of Aesthetic Phenomena

  • Adelheid Heftberger
Chapter
Part of the Quantitative Methods in the Humanities and Social Sciences book series (QMHSS)

Abstract

To say that a work of art may be broken down into smaller units may be a banal statement. It is also nothing new to portray or arrange these building blocks in one or another way, whether as part of the artistic process or due to a technical necessity during production. What for creative artists is an integral component of their work raises methodological questions in scholarship: is it academically even constructive to divide works of art into measurable units, to extract formalised data and transfer them to another system of recording in order to test theses or attain new statements? And if so, for which corpora and approaches would it be conceivable and meaningful? Different theoretical approaches have, after all, led to various methods in the study of film and literature.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adelheid Heftberger
    • 1
  1. 1.German Federal Archive (Bundesarchiv)BerlinGermany

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