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Contexts for Inter-organizational Engagement: Societal Concerns, Government Behavior, and Other Findings

  • Morgan R. Clevenger
Chapter

Abstract

Responses to the 1990s and early 2000s scandals are discussed to consider what society views as proper behavior with businesses. This chapter explores key issues and recent legislation providing more transparency and accountability. The past 50 years have created more transparency and greater expectations from businesses and their behaviors. This chapter explores societal expectations of organizational behavior through various principles and practices of morality, leadership modeling and governance, and organizational ethics. A major consideration in the 21st Century is accountability, which includes transparency. If not self-regulated, then governmental compliance aids in supporting ethical and conscientious practices. A number of business and industry organizations that foster dialogue and best practices for engagement with higher education are highlighted. Concerns and examples are noted as well as lessons learned. Finally, other findings from the research are discussed including culture, economic challenges, alumni connectivity, and geography.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morgan R. Clevenger
    • 1
  1. 1.Post-doctoral Fellow in Corporate Social Responsibility and Global Business EthicsMonarch Business SchoolZugSwitzerland

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