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Corporate Motives for Supporting Higher Education

  • Morgan R. Clevenger
Chapter

Abstract

Why do businesses and corporations want to partner with higher education institution? This chapter explores corporate behavior including statistics of corporate giving and engagement. Corporate citizenship motives are discussed following Cone’s (2010, The new era of global corporate citizenship & compliance. Presentation at Net Impact Conference, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI) corporate citizenship spectrum exploring philanthropy, cause-related branding, operational culture, and DNA citizenship ethos with sub-categories in each. Corporate organizational culture with summaries of each of the six companies and their culture. Four main themes are presented for research question two: Why do U.S. corporations engage as corporate citizens in relationships with a higher education institution? The four major themes are workforce development, community enrichment, brand development, and research. Finally, results of the campus observation to locate corporate namings and logos is presented, displayed, and discussed. Examples and goals from businesses and corporations will be shared.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Morgan R. Clevenger
    • 1
  1. 1.Post-doctoral Fellow in Corporate Social Responsibility and Global Business EthicsMonarch Business SchoolZugSwitzerland

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