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Prospects for Climate Services for Sustainable Agriculture in Tanzania

  • Moammar DayoubEmail author
  • Jaakko Helminen
  • Ville Myllynpää
  • Nicolas Pope
  • Mikko Apiola
  • Tomi Westerlund
  • Erkki Sutinen
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

Climate services offer information on temperature, rainfall, wind, soil moisture, early warnings, and long-term forecasts for agriculture. The objectives of this study are to explore the current state of climate services for farmers in the Morogoro region of Tanzania, to clarify the importance of climate services in decision-making, to identify sources of climate information available for farmers and to formulate the requirements to improve the system of climate services. The results show that accurate forecasts, both the short term and long term, could help farmers to decide when and what to plant and how to attend their crops. This information will be used to provide potential production choices, improved productivity and decreased risk. The major sources of information for farmers were essentially family, neighbours and friends. The results emphasised the importance of access to information and knowledge for farmers, for the agriculture sector and for general livelihood. The results showed that a participatory approach could achieve integration in designing and using a mobile application in agriculture to achieve sustainable development.

Keywords

Climate services Mobile application Tanzania Morogoro Weather forecasting 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Moammar Dayoub
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jaakko Helminen
    • 1
  • Ville Myllynpää
    • 1
  • Nicolas Pope
    • 1
  • Mikko Apiola
    • 1
  • Tomi Westerlund
    • 1
  • Erkki Sutinen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TurkuTurkuFinland

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