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The Conditions for Absorption Problems in Central and Eastern Europe

  • Christian Hagemann
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Union Politics book series (PSEUP)

Abstract

This chapter contains a fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA) of 17 operational programmes (OPs) in the new member states. The chapter introduces the cases and then presents the operationalization and calibration of the outcome and the causal conditions applied in the analysis. It includes a detailed discussion of different administrative capacities in the region, the structure of EU fund management systems, and the development of party competition in the new member states after democratization, focusing specifically on the alternation of parties in control of EU funded programmes during the financing period. It then conducts an analysis of necessity and sufficiency to account for the outcome of absorption problems as well as its complement. The chapter closes with a detailed discussion of results and their contribution.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Hagemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Technical University MunichMunichGermany

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