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Impact of Machine’s Robotisation on the Activity of an Operator in Picking Tasks

  • Adrian CouventEmail author
  • Mathieu Dridi
  • Nicolas Tricot
  • Christophe Debain
  • Mahmoud Almasri
  • Gil De Sousa
  • Gerald Chaloub
  • Marie Izaute
  • Fabien Coutarel
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 876)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an analysis of the activities during manual and robotised piece picking tasks to know and understand the impact of the robotisation. Here, this task is manually realized first and then partially automated with a robot. The activity is described with three indicators. These indicators are computed with image processing and a subdivision of the picking area. The robot has an impact on the activity because its introduction induces a convergence of the subjects to the same activity regardless without of their uses of technologies considering the interaction in this case.

Keywords

User-centred systems Human-machine systems Usability and user experience 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was financed by the French government IDEX-ISITE initiative 16-IDEX-0001 (CAP 20-25 with the support of the regional council Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes and the support with the European Union via the program FEDER).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian Couvent
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mathieu Dridi
    • 2
  • Nicolas Tricot
    • 1
  • Christophe Debain
    • 1
  • Mahmoud Almasri
    • 1
  • Gil De Sousa
    • 1
  • Gerald Chaloub
    • 2
  • Marie Izaute
    • 3
  • Fabien Coutarel
    • 2
  1. 1.IRSTEA, TSCFAubièreFrance
  2. 2.University Clermont AuvergneClermont-FerrandFrance
  3. 3.LAPSCOClermont-FerrandFrance

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