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Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)-Driven Design of a Planetary Gearbox for Active Wearable Robotics

  • Pablo López García
  • Stein Crispel
  • Tom Verstraten
  • Elias Saerens
  • Bryan Convens
  • Bram Vanderborght
  • Dirk Lefeber
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 22)

Abstract

Conducting an FMEA for the design of a planetary gear transmission for exoskeletons enables decision making based on the interdependence between design parameters and the device requirements, as well as an early identification of several functional risks. Therefore, the use of FMEAs in the design of wearable robotic devices could contribute to higher design robustness, and ultimately result in a broader acceptance of future active wearable robotic devices.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pablo López García
    • 1
  • Stein Crispel
    • 1
  • Tom Verstraten
    • 1
  • Elias Saerens
    • 1
  • Bryan Convens
    • 1
  • Bram Vanderborght
    • 1
  • Dirk Lefeber
    • 1
  1. 1.Robotics and Multibody Mechanics Research Group (R&MM), Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringVrije Universiteit Brussel and Flanders MakeElseneBelgium

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