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The Grainger Paradox: Manufacturing Hybridity, Circulating Exclusivity

  • Ryan R. Weber
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Music and Literature book series (PASTMULI)

Abstract

While the previous chapters have largely emphasized correspondences between members of an extended transatlantic network, this chapter investigates the ways in which Grainger deviated from the ideas and practices of his colleagues when he later came to understand hybridity as a danger to his self-proclaimed “Nordic race.” A central factor in this transformation was his encounter with the literature of American eugenicists, especially the writings of Madison Grant and Lothrop Stoddard. For this reason, this chapter explores how Grainger appropriated their ideas on individualism, progress, and hybridity in order to evaluate how modes of universalism extending back to Walt Whitman in the nineteenth century contributed to restrictive forms of cultural attachment in the twentieth century. Collectively, this chapter establishes that the forces of nationalism and cosmopolitanism are compatible not simply because of their similar embrace of universality but also because of their analogous limitations and powers of exclusivity.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan R. Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Misericordia UniversityDallasUSA

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