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Preliminary Investigation of a Newly Developed Tele-Rehabilitation Program for People Living with MCI Condition

  • L. MartiniEmail author
  • L. Fabbri
  • S. Pancani
  • I. Mosca
  • F. Gerli
  • F. Vannetti
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 21)

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment is a borderline condition between normal aging and first stages of dementia. Programs based on multidimensional trainings appear to have a role in reducing cognitive decline.

A 8 weeks tele-rehabilitation program, administered through an ad-hoc designed web-application, was developed. The design of the web-application was based on feedback received from specialists, patients and caregivers. The program comprised three trainings: cognitive, physical and social.

Thirty subjects (age 73 ± 4 yrs) with mild cognitive impairment were included in the study to investigate the feasibility of the proposed program. 25 participants completed the program and showed a high adherence to the proposed activities (85% and 83% for cognitive and physical activity, respectively). Good usability and high level of appreciation (mean appreciation = 3.7 ± 0.8, scale range 1–5) were reported together with physical and memory benefits. The proposed program seems thus suitable to provide multidimensional trainings to subjects living with mild cognitive impairment.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Martini
    • 1
    Email author
  • L. Fabbri
    • 1
  • S. Pancani
    • 1
  • I. Mosca
    • 1
  • F. Gerli
    • 1
  • F. Vannetti
    • 1
  1. 1.Don Carlo Gnocchi FoundationFlorenceItaly

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