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Autonomous Composition as Search in a Conceptual Space: A Computational Creativity View

  • F. Amílcar CardosoEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11265)

Abstract

Computational Creativity (CC) is an emerging field of research that focuses on the study and exploitation of the computers’ potential to act as autonomous creators and co-creators. The field is a confluence point for contributions from multiple disciplines, such as Artificial Intelligence, which provides most of its methodological framework, and also Cognitive Science, Psychology, Social Sciences and Philosophy, as well as creative domains like the Arts, Music, Design, Poetry, etc.

In this text, we briefly introduce some basic concepts and terminology of the field, as well as abstract models for characterising some common modes of creativity. We will illustrate how these concepts have been applied in recent times in the development of creative systems, particularly in the music domain. With this paper, we expect to contribute to facilitate communication between the CMMR and CC communities and foster synergies between them.

Keywords

Computational Creativity Algorithmic music composition Generative music 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CISUC, Department of Informatics Engineering, DEIUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal

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