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PAHs Monitoring in Soils Affected by Electric Power Station

  • Svetlana Sushkova
  • Abdulmalik Batukaev
  • Tatiana Minkina
  • Elena Antonenko
  • Irina Deryabkina
  • Jana Popileshko
  • Tamara Dudnikova
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

The environmental pollution in soils affected by emissions from the Novocherkasskaya Electric Power Station (NEPS) was monitored according the monitoring data of two years (2016–2017). The monitored sites are located on fallow lands 20 km around NEPS. PAHs extraction from the soil samples was performed using ecologically clean newly developed method of subcritical water extraction. The 5-km zone located in the northwestern direction from the power station, in direction of predominant winds was the most subjected to PAHs contamination, mostly high at a distance up to 5.0 km from the contamination source. The level of high-molecular PAHs exceeding the level low-molecular PAHs form the monitoring sites situated in direction of predominant winds from the energy plant. The vise-versa dependence was established for sites around NEPS. According the 16 priority PAHs content in the studied soils. The most subjected to environmental pollution of soils were the monitored sites located in direction of predominant winds from NEPS.

Keywords

PAHs Environmental pollution Monitoring Electric power station 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The investigation has been supported by the projects of RFBR 16-35-60051, Grant of the President of Russia MK-3476.2017.5, Ministry of Education and Science of Russia 5.948.2017/PCh.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Svetlana Sushkova
    • 1
  • Abdulmalik Batukaev
    • 2
  • Tatiana Minkina
    • 1
  • Elena Antonenko
    • 1
  • Irina Deryabkina
    • 1
  • Jana Popileshko
    • 1
  • Tamara Dudnikova
    • 1
  1. 1.Southern Federal UniversityRostov-on-DonRussia
  2. 2.Chechen State UniversityGroznyRussia

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