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Smart City Framework Development: Challenges and Solutions

  • Ahmed N. AL-Masri
  • Anthony Ijeh
  • Manal Nasir
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

This paper addresses the concept of the smart city and its significance to citizens. In this regard, recent literature about smart cities and in response to the increasing use of the concept is discussed. The study aims to introduce a developed framework to be used in modern smart cities with citizen engagement. Eight factors contribute to the smart city to be “smarter”: management and organization, technology, governance, policy context, citizen and communities, economy, built infrastructure, and natural environment. These factors are the base of an integrative framework that can be used to inspect how local governments are picturing smart city plans. The main framework suggests proposed agendas for smart city which lead to practical implications for government expertise. In this research, a smart city is defined in different areas of the world based on several literatures’. Finally, the study is focused on Dubai vision for smart city, which is based on the high business and innovation center.

Keywords

Smart city Smart city framework Citizen engagement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.American University in the EmiratesDubaiUAE

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