Advertisement

Potential Heavy Mineral-Enriched Black Sand Deposits South Ras Banas Red Sea Coast (Egypt)

  • Tarek IbrahimEmail author
  • Gouda Dabour
  • Minghua Ren
  • Gad El-Qady
  • Philip Goodell
  • Ibrahim Gaafar
  • Luis Sandoval
  • Munazzam Ali
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

The Red Sea Coast in the southernmost part of Egypt is characterized with an early geological history of erosion and sediment transportation through a remarkably long and wide paleo-channel. Several alluvial deposits rich in economic heavy minerals have been identified along the coastal strip lying between Ras Banas and the Sudaniese border. Accumulations of heavy minerals have been observed along the Red Sea beaches sited at Ras Manazel, Khudaa, Shalateen and Wadi Diit. These deposits have been formed not only by transport processes related to the Red Sea offshore currents, but also by the drainage networks operating in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Satellite imagery of the drainage networks indicates that the granites of the Sudanese highlands are the source origin of these minerals, with minor input from granites in the southern Egyptian highlands. Inland deposits emanating from the Red Sea current coastline have been formed before the opening of the Red Sea, and subsequent erosion and reworking through flash flooding and other catastrophic transport mechanisms has created more recent deposits along the current coastline. The deposits lying across the study area prove to contain ilmenite, magnetite, rutile, garnet, zircon and monazite, along with some radioactive minerals such as thorite with traces of gold. These mineral compositions are of high quality and match with those related to the granites persisting in Sudan and southern Egypt, as observed through the satellite imagery. The mineral concentrations and compositions appear to reflect the ilmenite granite series of Sudan and the magnetite granite series of the Egyptian Eastern Desert as derivative resources.

Keywords

Red sea fans Flash flooding Weathering Transportation Black sand Economic mineral resources 

References

  1. 1.
    Ibrahim, T.M., Abu Halawa, A., Ali, K.G., Gaafar, I.M.: Occurrence of black sand deposits on the Red Sea coastal plain of Wadi Diib, south Eastern Desert, Egypt: a preliminary study. Sed. Egypt 17, 107–116 (2009)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Abu Halawa, Masoud, S.M., Shahin, H.A.A., Embaby, A.A.: Economic and radioactive heavy minerals of El Hebal sand dunes, southern Eastern Desert, Egypt. Ann. Geol. Surv. Egypt XXXI, 449–465 (2009)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tarek Ibrahim
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gouda Dabour
    • 1
  • Minghua Ren
    • 2
  • Gad El-Qady
    • 3
  • Philip Goodell
    • 4
  • Ibrahim Gaafar
    • 1
  • Luis Sandoval
    • 4
  • Munazzam Ali
    • 4
  1. 1.Nuclear Materials AuthorityCairoEgypt
  2. 2.University of Nevada-Las VegasLas VegasUSA
  3. 3.National Research Institute of Astronomy and GeophysicsCairoEgypt
  4. 4.University of Texas at El PasoEl PasoUSA

Personalised recommendations