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Physical Characteristics of the Massive Meteorite of Saudi Empty Quarter

  • V. Masilamani
  • Nasser Alarif
  • W. Aslam Farooq
  • Muhammad AtifEmail author
  • Shahid Ramay
  • Hayat Saeed Althobaiti
  • Saqib Anwar
  • Ibrahim Elkhedr
  • M. S. AlSalhi
  • Bassam A. Abuamarah
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

The meteorite found in the Empty Quarter of the KSA is the largest meteorite and has the shape of an irregular ellipsoid of semi axes (0.65 × 0.38 × 0.27) and density of 6400 kg/m3 and mass of 2550 kg. It is a massive piece belonging to the category of iron–nickel meteorites with an occurrence (or fall) of only 5% of total showers. The present report was on the physical characteristics (elemental composition and structural) of this piece using laser break down spectroscopy (LIBS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer (EDX), Scanning Electron microscope (SEM) Xray diffraction (XRD) etc. Our investigation indicated that this piece consists of 91% iron, 5% Ni, 1.51% P, 0.3% Co, and a host of others; most of them exist as oxides. Since the measured density is only 6400 kg/m3 the meteorite is porous (approximately about 19%) which is confirmed by the micro hardness. Based on these physical measurements, it is very likely that this meteorite would have “escaped” from the belt around Mars and Jupiter and unlikely from the moon or elsewhere. This could be the first investigation, employing the above sophisticated instruments, on that massive Saudi meteorite.

Keywords

Physical characteristics Massive meteorite Saudi empty quarter Modern analytical methods 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the Deanship of Scientific Research, King Saud University for funding through Vice Deanship of Scientific Research Chairs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Masilamani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nasser Alarif
    • 3
  • W. Aslam Farooq
    • 1
  • Muhammad Atif
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Shahid Ramay
    • 1
  • Hayat Saeed Althobaiti
    • 1
  • Saqib Anwar
    • 4
  • Ibrahim Elkhedr
    • 3
  • M. S. AlSalhi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bassam A. Abuamarah
    • 3
  1. 1.Physics and Astronomy Department, College of ScienceKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Research Chair for Laser Diagnosis of CancerKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  3. 3.Department of Geology and Geophysics, College of ScienceKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Industrial Engineering Department, College of EngineeringKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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