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The New Medical World Order: Not So Flat

  • Rifat LatifiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

A few decades ago, the medical world did not have any particular order. Each country took care of people the way they thought it would be best. With some exceptions, hospitals for the most part, it existed in silos, isolated from other industries. However, there is a new medical order that has transformed the healthcare industry into a web-linked interdependent, complex, competitive industry, with the philosophy of domination, takeover of hospitals and creating large corporation of healthcare industry for the most part. This world order is with full contrasts, growing the gap wider between the hospitals of western world and third world countries and between hospitals of rural and urban America. So, the medical world, after all, may not be so flat.

Keywords

Modern hospital Transformation of medicine Two worlds Advanced technologies; access to care Global surgery 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New York Medical College, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Westchester Medical CenterValhallaUSA

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