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National Cultural Autonomy in Central and Eastern Europe: Challenges and Possibilities

  • Federica Prina
  • David J. Smith
  • Judit Molnar Sansum
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Territorial Politics book series (COMPTPOL)

Abstract

The chapter examines the law and practice of national cultural autonomy (NCA) from the perspective of participation of national minorities in four countries in Central and Eastern Europe: Estonia, the Russian Federation, Hungary and Serbia. It considers both the levels of autonomy of NCA institutions, and their co-decision-making competences with government structures. On the basis of qualitative data from the authors’ fieldwork, the chapter shows that, while NCA has had only a marginal role in furthering democratic pluralism in the region, its practice provides insights on the internal nuances and complexity of NCA institutions. Significant variations emerge with reference to type of national minority, political priorities and historical legacies, highlighting the importance of minority-centred and flexible approaches to NCA. Finally, the chapter considers how lessons from Central and Eastern Europe may be relevant in developing a framework for the accommodation of Turkey’s Kurdish community which incorporates NCA elements.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Federica Prina
    • 1
  • David J. Smith
    • 1
  • Judit Molnar Sansum
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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